Guava Family Lotus Travel Crib Review

A lightweight travel crib that delivers on simplicity and portability

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5

Guava Family Lotus Travel Crib

Guava Family Lotus Travel Crib

Verywell Family / Charlene Petitjean-Barkulis

What We Like
  • A breeze to pop open

  • Convenient and compact carry bag

  • Transforms into a play yard

  • Reasonably priced

What We Don't Like
  • Mattress is thin and made of cold plastic

  • No fitted sheet

  • Tricky to fold

Bottom Line

With its quick setup, small footprint, and convenient carry bag, the Guava Family Lotus Travel Crib is a must-have for globetrotting families.

5

Guava Family Lotus Travel Crib

Guava Family Lotus Travel Crib

Verywell Family / Charlene Petitjean-Barkulis

Traveling with children gets physical quickly. The amount of stuff you have to schlep is slightly crazy. But the Lotus Travel Crib by Guava Family, one of the most highly rated play yards out there, is heralded for its lightweight construction, ease of use, and safe design. We tested it out on a trip to California to see for ourselves. Read on to find out how the pack ‘n play fared.

Guava Family Lotus Travel Crib
Verywell Family / Charlene Petitjean-Barkulis

Setup Process: As user-friendly as it gets

I’ve broken a sweat trying to put together travel cribs before. Some of them require serious puzzle skills, too, but that’s not the case with the Lotus. It took me all but two minutes to set it up. You simply take the crib out of its bag and open the folded mattress that contains the frame when in the bag. Next, extend the aluminum legs and pull the sides of the crib open to arm’s width. At that point, the frame will fully extend, and the top rail will click sturdily into place. Add the mattress in, and voilà! 

The only time-consuming step here is the last one: You have to secure the mattress to the frame. To do that, you have to feed the Velcro tabs that are on each corner and side of the mattress (six in total) to the base of the crib. This is a safety mechanism that’s common in travel cribs, so as to prevent space the mattress separating from the frame.

I’ve broken a sweat trying to put together travel cribs before…but that’s not the case with the Lotus.

Folding the Lotus can be slightly trickier, though still easier than other lightweight travel cribs we’ve used. Once you’re done using it, take the mattress out and loosen the frame by squeezing levers on each side of the crib. The levers are easy to locate; just look for arrows on the rail’s fabric. Once you do that, you’ll be able to zig-zag the mattress into a tight fold and secure it closed with the clip. That taken care of, you’ll want to fold the legs by pulling them back. This step didn’t come naturally to me and required the kind precision and strength that slowed the process down ever so slightly. Once you fold the legs, the frame is ready to fit back into the mattress, which can then go back into the carry case which can be conveniently worn like a backpack. 

Guava Family Lotus Travel Crib
Verywell Family / Charlene Petitjean Barkulis

Design: Clean and simple design that will grow with your baby

The Guava Lotus Travel Crib has a simple and clean design. I particularly love its color block combo. The crib’s fabric is a soft grey and black mélange and its frame is a clean white which is ideal for modern, design-driven parents. The black carry bag that it comes in is sleek and fit seamlessly with our other belongings—no one suspected we were hauling a piece of baby gear around.  

When assembled, the travel crib measures 46 x 32 inches. The mattress itself measures 41 x 23 inches, which is longer and narrower than other travel cribs. This is great for bigger kids. Our 2-year-old son, who’s already 37 inches tall, comfortably fits in the crib. There isn’t much room left, but that doesn’t seem to bother him.

No matter how much my little one moved in his sleep, the mattress stayed in place, which meant he didn’t startle or wake himself up.

The only downside to the crib’s unconventional size is that you have to purchase the brand’s fitted sheets which are specially made for the Lotus. These cost $20, so it’s an added expense to consider—especially since you’ll probably want at least two in case of a blowout or spit-up incidents.  

Another design consideration we were perplexed by at first: The mattress, which rests directly on the floor without any elevation from your typical crib legs or feet. Guava Family notes that the floor-resting mattress is beneficial for a few reasons. It doesn’t shake or squeak when your little one rolls around; you can unzip the side and transform the crib into a play yard; and it doesn’t weigh as much as standard travel cribs. The last factor is one we can get down with as the Lotus weighs much less than other travel cribs and is therefore easier to lug around. And after testing it out, we did find that the floor-resting mattress—paired with the crib’s diagonal leg design—offered more stability. No matter how much my little one moved in his sleep, the mattress stayed in place, which meant he didn’t startle or wake himself up. 

Guava Family Lotus Travel Crib
Lifewire / Charlene Petitjean - Barukulis 

Portability: Lightweight and easy to carry 

No one wants to travel with a bulky crib that drags on the floor and that you ultimately need to check in at the airport. Luckily, portability is where the Lotus shines. When folded, the crib, which weighs a mere 13 pounds (less than half the weight of most mainstream travel cribs) shrinks to a very manageable 24 x 7 x 11 inches. It also slips into a carry bag that functions like a backpack. This proved to be an amazing feature as I was able to navigate the airport hands-free, tending to my children and even myself. 

The Lotus Crib also folds down small enough to be taken through airport security and onto a plane. My husband and I have tried to sneak other travel cribs in, but we’ve always ended up being asked to check them in, so this was a major win!

The black carry bag…is sleek and fit seamlessly with our other belongings—no one suspected we were hauling a piece of baby gear around.

When open, the Lotus is just as easy to move around the house; and once you’re done using it, it’s compact and can be stored away in the tightest closet corner. 

We’ve also used it for our nanny share, and it’s really simplified the drop-off process. I’ve been able to carry the travel crib as a backpack while hauling my little one in his stroller—and all of this without breaking my back.  

Comfort: Perhaps more parent- than baby-centric? 

Guava Family claims that their mattress is thick and comfy, giving babies “all-night comfort.” But I found it to be rather thin, which is problematic considering it sits directly on the floor. To us, the surface feels a bit hard and more appropriate for playtime than bedtime. 

What’s more, the mattress, which is made of insulated foam, has a waterproof cover. This is great to protect against baby’s usual accidents, but it makes for a cold surface to sleep on. My son still slept through the night, and my nanny says that it hasn’t affected naptime, but I felt guilty having him sleep on a plastic-like austere surface. That’s why I think Guava’s crib sheets are indispensable. Note, however, that if you purchase the crib on Amazon, you will need to buy the fitted sheet separately

One great feature is the crib’s crawl-through zipper door. This is great not only for playtime, but for soothing baby to sleep. Thanks to this thoughtful feature, I was able to comfort my toddler as he drifted off to sleep without having to lean over and break my back. This feature is an undeniable plus for parents who know they will have to tend to their kids at bedtime for an extended period of time.

Guava Family Lotus Travel Crib
Verywell Family / Charlene Petitjean - Barkulis

Safety: Breathable and eco-conscious 

Unlike many other travel cribs, the Lotus is constructed from a whole lot of mesh. It’s on all four sides, and from below the mattress all the way up to the top rail. This makes for a safe, breathable environment for littles to sleep in. What’s more, I’m able to peek in on my son from wherever I stand. If you have a super smart tot on your hand, you can also lock the side zipper in place to prevent them from escaping. 

Last—but definitely not least—the Lotus is Greenguard certified. This means the crib has met strict chemical emissions limits and is free from PVC, phthalates, flame retardants, and other substances that pose a threat to your child’s health.

Price: Beats the competition

The Lotus Travel Crib has an MSRP of $249.95 but you can often find it for $200 or less at online retailers like Amazon. Considering all the bells and whistles it comes with, it’s certainly worth the price. While you can certainly find cheaper options, if you’re looking at well-known brands like BabyBjörn or 4moms, the Lotus is actually mid-range in price. 

Guava Family Lotus Travel Crib v. BabyBjörn Travel Crib Light 

Guava Family’s Travel Crib and BabyBjörn’s Travel Crib Light are very similar. They’re roughly the same size, they’re a breeze to set up, they’re lightweight, and they both have mesh on all four sides. That said, the Lotus’ carry bag, which can morph into a backpack, is much more convenient that BabyBjörn’s. Plus, the BabyBjörn travel crib retails for $320—that’s $70 more than the Lotus. If you’re looking for a long-lasting crib that won’t add to the exhaustion of family travel (or break the bank in the process), the Lotus is our top choice. 

Final Verdict

Yes, buy it! 

If you’re in search of a travel crib that is compact, user-friendly, safe, and eco-friendly, the Lotus is everything you’re looking for. Get it and you won’t regret it!

Specs

  • Product Name Lotus Travel Crib
  • Product Brand Guava Family
  • SKU B00AKKDSNG
  • Price $249.95
  • Weight 13 lbs.
  • Product Dimensions 46 x 32 x 25.5 in.
  • Material Aluminum frame, mesh fabric
  • Warranty 30 days for a full return; 3-year warranty
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