The Very Best Travel Strollers That We Folded, Pushed, Carried, and Dropped One-Handed

Our testing showed that the Nuna TRVL is an ideal travel companion

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Travel Strollers

Verywell Family / Phoebe Cheong

Once you welcome a child into your family, "traveling light" is no longer a thing. But it is possible to take certain conveniences with you on the road or in the air, and a travel stroller is one of those things that makes many family trips a whole lot easier. In contrast to the large, luxury baby strollers with all the bells and whistles, we're talking about the lightweight versions, some of which can fold to the size of a backpack and even fit in an overhead compartment. To find the very best travel strollers, we put 18 of them through the wringer at the Verywell Testing Lab.

Tested & Approved

The Nuna TRVL stroller earned 5 out of 5 in ease of folding and maneuverability, making it our favorite on the list. For another even lighter option, the Joolz AER is a sleek choice for travel. 

Not everyone has the same criteria for a stroller, let alone a travel stroller. "It depends on the location of vacation and how much travel time is involved," says Nkeiruka U. Orajiaka, MBBS, a board-certified pediatrician, public health physician in Columbus, Ohio, and member of Buybuy Baby's Parenting Pros. "While you want a stroller that can stand the long distance and possibly faster movements, you also want it to be able to [around] maneuver small areas."

You may be looking for a stroller that's as light as possible, one that you can squeeze into the trunk of your car, or one you can fold with one hand while also holding a cranky baby and a suitcase. Sometimes sun canopies and storage space are top priorities; sometimes it's the ability to push through crowds and over rough terrain. And sometimes you want a low-cost option, so that more of your vacation budget can go elsewhere. We took all these criteria into account while researching and testing, before narrowing down our list to eight winners.

Based on our extensive testing, here are the very best travel strollers out there.

Best Overall: Nuna TRVL Stroller

4.8
Our Ratings
  • Design
    4.8/5
  • Maneuverability
    5/5
  • Portability
    4.2/5
  • Durability
    5/5
  • Ease of Folding
    5/5
Pros
  • Easiest fold

  • Attractive design

  • Roomy storage compartment

Cons
  • Expensive

Not only was the Nuna TRVL love at first sight for some of our testers, but this stroller also passed our tests with flying colors, earning it our best overall ranking. The most standout feature is how easily it folds and unfolds, with the push of a button on the handlebar, and we gave it a score of 5 out of 5 stars for that attribute. "Whoa! It folds for you!" exclaimed tester Chris Abell, senior commerce editor at Travel + Leisure.

The TRVL also earned top marks (5 stars) in the maneuverability test, taking turns "like a dream" over carpet, hard floor, and even gravel, thanks to the front- and rear-wheel suspension. Then there's the design: The fabric, plus the faux leather handle and bumper bar, all have a luxurious look to them, while also being water repellent. The UPF 50+ canopy offers a lot of coverage for the child and has a mesh window for peeking at the kid and improving airflow. The back also zips open for airflow, and it reclines to a comfortable sleeping angle with a drawstring you can operate with one hand—and we all know how important those naps are during travel! The seat is a comfortable 13 inches wide, and the calf rest can go all the way flat for naps or fold down for a more active position.

The magnetic buckles were also easy to operate without much fuss, and the harness doesn't require rethreading to adjust the height. Travelers will also appreciate the storage compartment at the bottom of the stroller, which can easily fit a full backpack.

Our only small complaint with this stroller is that at 15.4 pounds, it wasn't the absolute lightest to carry when folded and didn't have a built-in strap for toting around. For hands-free carrying, you'll have to use the included travel bag. It could conceivably fit into an overhead storage bin, but at this size, we suspect most airlines will still have you gate-check it.  

The Nuna is also one of the most expensive strollers we tested, but you get a lot for your money. Nuna Pipa infant car seats don't even need an extra attachment to click into the bumper bar, so if you're a frequent traveler or just want to go on local adventures, this may be the only stroller you need.

Dimensions (inches): 12" H x 22.5" L x 20.25" W folded, 41" H x 31" L x 20.5" W unfolded | Seat dimensions (inches): 10" L x 13" W | Weight: 15.4 pounds | Child age/weight range: Birth (with car seat) up to 50 pounds

Nuna Trvl Stroller

Verywell Family / Conor Ralph

Best Overall Runner-Up: Uppababy Minu

4.7
Uppababy Minu

Uppababy

Our Ratings
  • Design
    4.7/5
  • Maneuverability
    4.7/5
  • Portability
    4.8/5
  • Durability
    4.5/5
  • Ease of Folding
    4.8/5
Pros
  • Compact and easy to carry

  • Padded, reclining seat

  • Full sun canopy

Cons
  • Smaller under-seat storage (in original model)

  • Unfolding process takes getting used to 

Lightweight and easy to fold, the Uppababy Minu is close behind the Nuna when it comes to travel features. At first glance, it looks very similar to other Uppababy models, but with a one-handed fold (earning 4.8 for that attribute), it collapses to a size you could fit into an overhead compartment (though your airline may still ask you to gate-check). Once folded, there's a padded shoulder strap you can sling on to carry it hands-free, which is why we also gave it a 4.8 for portability. 

The Minu looks to be a comfortable ride for littles, as the padded seat reclines quite far for napping and the full UPF 50+ sun canopy includes a mesh window for airflow (and peeking). In the first version of the Minu, the calf rest is not adjustable, and the five-point harness requires rethreading to adjust the height. As for parents' comfort, the under-seat storage space is slightly smaller than on the Nuna, but the leather handlebar is every bit as cushy and posh-looking. The stroller handled our maneuverability tests well, though it felt slightly heavier than the Joolz AER. During the durability drop test, a rod from the canopy came loose, but it was easy to put back in place.

We tested the Minu just before Uppababy released the Minu V2, but many of the features we like in the original remain in the update. The key differences are a canopy that zips open to expand, an included bumper bar, a hinge in the locking mechanism, a no-rethread harness, a bigger under-seat storage basket, an adjustable calf rest, more color choices, and compatibility with the Uppababy bassinet. The extras do mean it weighs about 2 pounds more (and costs an average of $50 more), so it's up to you to decide if your kid's comfort is more important than your own in this case.

Dimensions (inches): 12" H x 22.5" L x 20.25" W folded, 41" H x 31" L x 20.5" W unfolded | Seat dimensions (inches): 9.5" L x 13" W | Weight: 14.75 pounds | Child age/weight range: Birth (with kit sold separately) to 50 pounds

Uppababy Minu Stroller lab test

Verywell Family / Conor Ralph

Best Travel Design: Joolz AER Premium Baby Stroller

4.8
Joolz AER

Joolz

Our Ratings
  • Design
    4.6/5
  • Maneuverability
    4.9/5
  • Portability
    4.9/5
  • Durability
    5/5
  • Ease of Folding
    4.9/5
Pros
  • Sleek canopy and seat design

  • Comfortable carrying strap

  • Lifetime warranty

Cons
  • Calf-rest sold separately

  • Buckle can be annoying

Joolz was another favorite among the testers for its lightweight, ergonomic design that will please both grown-ups and littles. We like how the seat padding hugs around little passengers. Both the canopy and the seat reclining feature use zippers to hide the extra fabric when not in use, creating a sleeker look and making it less fussy when folded. When it's all packed up, the elastic strap makes hands-free carrying downright comfortable—especially since it weighs just about 14 pounds, earning a 4.9 for portability.

The one-handed fold (using two buttons) earned it a 4.9 for that attribute as well. The stroller also includes a rain cover and a travel bag for extra convenience and protection on your various journeys.

This was one of the most compact strollers we tested, but it doesn't sacrifice much for its size. It handled all surfaces easily in the maneuverability test (probably because of its light weight). The only complaint we might have in terms of kids' comfort is the lack of calf-rest, but that can be purchased separately. After using this stroller at home, our tester also found that the buckle, which attaches at four separate points, can be annoying at times. 

There are two bonus details we love about Joolz: The stroller comes with a lifetime warranty, and for every stroller purchased, the brand plants a tree in Colombia.

Dimensions (inches): 9.2" H x 20.25" L x 16.25" W folded, 42" H x 25" L x 17" W unfolded | Weight: 14.1 pounds | Child age/weight range: Birth (with car seat adapter) to 50 pounds

Joolz AER travel stroller lab test

Verywell Family / Conor Ralph

Best Double: Uppababy G-Link 2 Stroller

4.7
G-Link 2 Stroller

Courtesy of Amazon

Our Ratings
  • Design
    4.4/5
  • Maneuverability
    4.7/5
  • Portability
    4.4/5
  • Durability
    5/5
  • Ease of Folding
    4.8/5
Pros
  • Narrow and light for a double stroller

  • Smooth folding

  • Easy to push and turn

Cons
  • Doesn't get very small when folded

  • No carrying strap

While there is nothing easy about traveling with two stroller-age kiddos, having a compact double travel stroller can go a long way toward making it easier. The G-Link 2 is a side-by-side umbrella stroller that manages to be smaller than most because it has only four sets of wheels instead of the typical six. The folding mechanism, a loop between the handles that you pull up, is surprisingly smooth, earning it a 4.8 for ease of folding.

We were also pleasantly surprised by how well this stroller handled our little obstacle course, taking turns and bumps as if it were a single stroller, and gave it a 4.7 for maneuverability. But while we appreciate the generous UPF 50+ canopies, fully reclining seats, and well-placed cup holder, this stroller just didn't match the single strollers for portability and design.

Dimensions (inches): 14" H x 40" L x 17.5" W folded, 41" H x 25" L x 28.25" W unfolded | Seat dimensions (inches): 10" L x 11" W | Weight: 21.8 pounds | Child age/weight range: 3 months up to 55 pounds (per seat)

UppaBaby G-Link 2 Double Umbrella Stroller lab test

Verywell Family / Conor Ralph

Best Comfort: Baby Jogger City Tour 2

4.6
Baby Jogger City Tour 2

Courtesy of Amazon

Our Ratings
  • Design
    4.5/5
  • Maneuverability
    4.8/5
  • Portability
    4.5/5
  • Durability
    4.5/5
  • Ease of Folding
    4.5/5
Pros
  • Lighter than most others

  • Easy to push and turn

  • Reclines for comfortable napping

Cons
  • Folding does take two hands to complete

  • No strap for hands-free carrying

  • Under-seat storage could be bigger

With a price point about $200 less than its travel stroller competitors, the City Tour 2 is as lightweight (14.5 pounds) and almost as easy to fold as our top picks. Though it's advertised as having a one-handed fold, after pushing the two buttons at the handlebar and collapsing the stroller, you do need two hands to finish the process and lock it into place, so we rated it a 4.5 for that attribute. Once it's folded, however, it's easy to pick up at the handle with one hand. For hands-free carrying, you'll have to put it in the included travel bag. It may fit in a larger overhead compartment, and the front wheels detach pretty easily to squeeze into tighter spaces. 

One of the best features of City Tour 2 is the way the seat reclines way back and the calf rest extends all the way flat, which combined with the full-coverage UPF 50+ canopy (with a peekaboo window), makes for a very cozy portable nap space. The five-point harness is well cushioned but requires rethreading to adjust the height. We did note a few design drawbacks, such as a smaller under-seat storage compartment than we'd like, and a lack of special features like a cup-holder or a bumper bar (which can be purchased separately).

Meanwhile, the grownup behind the handlebar won't be struggling to push their little passenger—this stroller earned a 4.8 in our maneuverability test. The front wheels have suspension, while the back wheels are slightly larger, helping it get over curbs and bumpy surfaces.

Dimensions (inches): 7" H x 22.5" L 19.5" W folded, 40" H x 26" L x 20" W unfolded | Seat dimensions (inches): 9" L x 13" W | Weight: 14.5 pounds | Child age/weight range: Birth (with car seat attachment) to 45 pounds

Baby Jogger City Tour 2 Travel Stroller Lab Test

Verywell Family / Conor Ralph

What Our Testers Say

"The maneuverability of the Baby Jogger is exceptional. There was little perceptible difference between the shag carpet and the smooth wood and tile surfaces. And while other strollers struggled a bit on the gravel, this stroller navigated it with ease, and I felt minimal bumps in the handlebar." — Ashleigh Morley, Verywell Commerce Editorial Director

Best One-Handed Fold: GB Qbit+ All City Stroller

4.8
gb QBit+ All-City Stroller

Courtesy of Amazon

Our Ratings
  • Design
    4.8/5
  • Maneuverability
    4.9/5
  • Portability
    4/5
  • Durability
    5/5
  • Ease of Folding
    4.9/5
Pros
  • Very easy to fold

  • Stands up when folded

  • Suspension makes ride smooth

Cons
  • Heavier than other travel options

  • Canopy could be bigger

You're not seeing double; the GB Qbit+ All City does look very similar to the Nuna TRVL. If you love the look of our best overall pick and want to spend around $70 less, this may be the way to go. Like the Nuna, this stroller features luxe-looking fabric and faux leather on the bumper bar and handle, and it too folds down to carry-on size with just one hand and the push of two buttons. The two strollers are not identical, however.

In the lab, we admired this stroller's smoothness and ease of folding (rating it 4.9 for that attribute). When the seat reclines, it also opens a nice mesh window for a breezy ride. That ride will also be comfortable thanks to the all-wheel suspension, which made going over the bumps of gravel in our test barely different than going over the hardwood floor. Still, we didn't find it quite as portable as some of our top picks, mostly because it weighs a few pounds more, at 17.6 pounds, and it doesn't have a carrying strap. We also wish the canopy had more coverage, especially if this is something you want to take on a sunny vacation.

One more note: GB may be better known in this category for its Pockit Air All-Terrain stroller, which truly is lightweight and packs up to the size of a backpack. That stroller performed poorly in all other categories, though, and we didn't feel we could recommend it.

Dimensions (inches): 10.5" H x 23" L x 16.5" W folded, 41" H x 24" L x 17" W unfolded | Seat dimensions (inches): 9" L x 13" W | Weight: 17.6 pounds | Child age/weight range: Birth (if used with Cybex infant car seat) to 55 pounds

GB Qbit+ All City Travel Stroller lab test

Verywell Family / Conor Ralph

Best Umbrella: UPPAbaby G-LUXE Stroller

4.5
UPPAbaby G-LUXE Stroller

Courtesy of Amazon

Our Ratings
  • Design
    4.5/5
  • Maneuverability
    4.7/5
  • Portability
    3.9/5
  • Durability
    5/5
  • Ease of Folding
    4.2/5
Pros
  • Comfortable seating and reclining

  • Generous canopy

  • Convenient shoulder strap

Cons
  • Doesn't fold very small

  • Storage access partially blocked by seat

Two out of the three parents testing these strollers in the lab have had G-Luxe strollers at home, but we were still pleasantly surprised to see how well this very reasonably priced umbrella stroller stood up to the fancier competition. It may be slightly heavier than a typical travel stroller, and it doesn't fold up into carry-on size, but since it's less than half the cost of the Nuna TRVL, you probably won't mind gate-checking it (and you can even purchase a very nice travel bag for that purpose). The reliable, sturdy frame also means it's not going to get damaged when tossed around by the baggage handlers.

Though the G-Luxe didn't score particularly high for portability (3.9) because of its size, its built-in shoulder strap does allow for easy, hands-free carrying. When you get to your destination and need to save space, it also stands up on its own when folded. This stroller did earn high marks for maneuverability (4.7), and was pretty great (4.5) for design, too. The latter is because the padded seat reclines quite far, the calf rest is fully extendable, there's a generous UPF 50+ canopy, the cup holder is included, and we really like the denim blue color option. Two potential drawbacks are the lack of a peekaboo window in the canopy and the fact that the under-seat storage space is a bit difficult to access, especially when the seat is reclined. 

If your travel plans include a lot of city trekking and not a lot of packing into small car trunks, this stroller would save you some money and give your kid a comfy seat from which to enjoy your adventures.

Dimensions (inches): 15" H x 41" L x 11.75" W folded, 42.5" H 23.5" L x 18.5" W unfolded | Seat dimensions (inches): 9" L x 13" W | Weight: 16.5 pounds | Child age/weight range: 3 months to 55 pounds

Uppababy G-Luxe Travel Stroller lab test

Verywell Family / Conor Ralph

What Our Testers Say

“I had an older version of the G-Luxe, and that carrying strap was indispensable as we walked up and down the many stairs of the New York City Subway system. That stroller also survived being gate-checked on many flights, and we particularly loved having it on a trip to Seattle and Vancouver, so our son could nap in it while we continued to sightsee.” — Sabrina Rojas Weiss, Verywell Family commerce parenting editor

Best Budget: Kolcraft Cloud Plus Stroller

4.2
Kolcraft Cloud Plus Lightweight Stroller

Courtesy of Amazon

Our Ratings
  • Design
    3.9/5
  • Maneuverability
    4.2/5
  • Portability
    3/5
  • Durability
    4.5/5
  • Ease of Folding
    4.8/5
Pros
  • Simple folding mechanism

  • Comes with trays for child and grownup

  • Very light

Cons
  • Loud branding on handle

  • Too big for overhead bins

  • No carrying strap

If your budget is tight, and all you need is a stroller for vacations, the Kolcraft Cloud Plus offers all the essentials for less than $80 (at the time of this writing). It's not the prettiest or smallest on our list, but it is the lightest, weighing in at under 12 pounds. The one-handed (two-button) fold took a bit of strength and coordination at first, but we got the hang of it after a couple of tries in the lab. Once folded, it won't fit in an overhead bin on the plane and it has no carrying strap, which is why we gave it only a 3 for portability. But again, for a stroller at this price, you probably won't mind checking it. During durability testing, the trays came loose, though they were easy to reattach. 

Those trays—one for the kid and one for the adult, with two drink holders each—are one of the features that make this an attractive option for travel. Another is the roomy under-seat storage compartment. On the other hand, if your kid is a big stroller napper, you may not be pleased with the fact that it reclines only about three-fourths of the way, and there is no calf rest. It does have front-wheel suspension, and while it wasn't the most agile on bumpy surfaces, the light weight made it easy enough to push through any small obstacles. The stroller's highest marks (4.8) were for its overall value. If that's most important for you, go with this option.

Dimensions (inches): 10" H x 33" L x 17.5" W folded, 38" H x 27" L x 18" W unfolded | Seat dimensions (inches): 9" L x 13" W | Weight: 11.8 pounds | Child age/weight range: 6 months to 50 pounds

Kolcraft Cloud Plus

Verywell Family / Conor Ralph

Compare

Overall Rating Design Maneuverability Portability Durability Ease of Folding
Best Overall:
Nuna TRVL Stroller
4.8
4.8 5 4.2 5 5
Uppababy Minu
Best Overall Runner-Up:
Uppababy Minu
4.7
4.7 4.7 4.8 4.5 4.8
Joolz AER
Best Travel Design:
Joolz AER Premium Baby Stroller
4.8
4.6 4.9 4.9 5 4.9
G-Link 2 Stroller
Best Double:
Uppababy G-Link 2 Stroller
4.7
4.4 4.7 4.4 5 4.8
Baby Jogger City Tour 2
Best Comfort:
Baby Jogger City Tour 2
4.6
4.5 4.8 4.5 4.5 4.5
gb QBit+ All-City Stroller
Best One-Handed Fold:
GB Qbit+ All City Stroller
4.8
4.8 4.9 4 5 4.9
UPPAbaby G-LUXE Stroller
Best Umbrella:
UPPAbaby G-LUXE Stroller
4.5
4.5 4.7 3.9 5 4.2
Kolcraft Cloud Plus Lightweight Stroller
Best Budget:
Kolcraft Cloud Plus Stroller
4.2
3.9 4.2 3 4.5 4.8

Final Verdict

The Nuna TRVL Stroller impressed testers the most in all the important categories, so much so that we would consider it a great option for everyday use as well as our top pick for a travel stroller. Not only does it look good, but it's also so easy to fold and take along on any adventure. For those traveling with two little ones, the Uppababy G-Link 2 is a surprisingly portable and maneuverable double stroller.

How We Rated the Best Travel Strollers

4.8 to 5 stars: These are the best travel strollers we tested. We recommend them without reservation.

4.5 to 4.7 stars: These travel strollers are excellent—they might have minor flaws, but we still recommend them.

4.0 to 4.5 stars: We think these are great travel strollers, but others are better.

3.5 to 3.9 stars: These travel strollers are just average.

3.4 and below: We don't recommend travel strollers with this rating; you won't find any on our list.

How We Tested Travel Strollers

Three editors tested out 18 strollers in the Verywell Lab in New York City, evaluating each on six different attributes: ease of folding, portability, design, maneuverability, durability, and value. We kept the advice of pediatrician Dr. Orajiaka in mind while assessing the strollers' safety features. We also independently weighed and measured the strollers, folded and unfolded, since size is one of the most important factors in a travel stroller.

Testers took turns folding and unfolding the strollers about four times each. The strollers that only required one hand to fold, without having to read complicated instructions, scored the highest marks. For portability, we carried the strollers around the room and tested whether they would fit on a shelf that was the approximate size of an average airplane overhead compartment. We pushed the strollers (with weight bags as "babies") through an indoor course that had shag carpeting, hardwood flooring, and gravel to test their maneuverability. We checked that the brakes on each stroller were easy to use and logically placed. We also dropped each stroller from hip height and then pushed them off a table to evaluate durability. Almost all of the strollers earned a 5 in that attribute, save a couple on which a few pieces came loose but did not break off.

Value and design were more subjective attributes. We looked at the various features we would want for our own travels with children, including safety (sun-protective canopies and reliable harnesses), comfort for the child, comfort for the adult, storage space, and attractiveness. Finally, we took all the other attributes into account relative to the price of each stroller to assess their value.

Travel Stroller lab test overhead compartment

Verywell Family / Conor Ralph

What to Look for in a Travel Stroller

The criteria you use to choose a travel stroller will vary based on your child or children's needs, how you plan to travel, and what you plan to do when you get there. Still, we think there are some basic needs every stroller should meet, and some things that are very nice to have.

Safety Features

"If safety is not highly considered, multiple different injuries can occur, including head injuries, fractures, lacerations, and skin friction or rubs," Dr. Orajiaka tells us. These can happen if the child isn't buckled in properly, the brakes aren't applied when the stroller is unattended by an adult, the child's foot gets caught in the foot rest, the stroller isn't sturdy enough, or extra items tip the stroller over. For all of these reasons, you should pay attention to the manufacturer's age and weight limits and follow them closely. 

If your baby is younger than the recommended age for the stroller, see if there are additional bassinet features you can attach, or adapters for your infant car seat. Many parents and caregivers like to use the Doona stroller, which folds into a car seat, for traveling with a newborn. In the lab test, we found that it didn't seem worth the cost to use for such a short time, when a stroller you can use for years can cost much less.

A canopy for the sun isn't exactly a short-term safety feature, but Dr. Orajiaka believes it's also quite essential for children's long-term health.

"I consider them important," she tells us. "It can protect your child from direct sun rays or other inclement weather. Children younger than 6 months are not old enough to use sunscreen, so this is an additional way to keep them protected."

Size and Weight

The size and weight of your stroller are a matter of personal preference to consider. If you plan to use your travel stroller only on short trips, you can choose something extra compact and light, while compromising on other features. This may mean the stroller isn't able to recline for naps; it may lack suspension in the wheels, or it may not have a bumper bar or a full sun canopy. On the other hand, if you want all the features that you look for in an everyday stroller, you will probably wind up with something slightly heavier that doesn't fit as well into car trunks and overhead compartments. Remember that even though several travel strollers fit in overhead compartments on planes, some airlines may still ask you to gate-check your stroller on a full flight.

"Strollers with wide bases are preferred as they are less likely to tip over," Dr. Orajiaka says.

Nuna Trvl and GB Qbit+ All City Travel Stroller lab test

Verywell Family / Conor Ralph

Ease of Use

Some of the travel strollers we tested felt like they required a technical manual and an advanced degree to fold up properly. Others folded easily, but we couldn't manage the harness buckles without hurting our fingers. Managing either of those tasks with a crying baby or a screaming toddler in the middle of an airport would be exponentially more difficult, which is why we made sure to list only the strollers that were easiest to operate, sometimes even one-handed. If you purchase a stroller and operating it isn't intuitive, return it and try something new. There are so many options out there, one will make sense for you.

Maneuverability is another key component to ease of use. If you're traveling with luggage and/or walking in unfamiliar places, you'll be happy the stroller can handle bumps, turns, and getting around crowds.

Comfort and Style

When it comes to comfort, consider how a stroller feels for both the child riding in it and the grown-ups pushing it. For children, padding, foot and calf rests, reclining seats, and adjustable harnesses are all features to think about. For adults, the handle height should be comfortable, and the stroller should feel light when you push it and when you lift it up for storage (and stairs!). You may also want extra features like cup holders, storage pockets, and generous under-seat storage so that everything you and your kid needs is within reach.

Finally, getting a stroller with a look you like isn't just about what others will see. If you'll be taking this on family trips, it will wind up in family photos, so you'll be looking at it for many years to come. 

Frequently Asked Questions

  • When is a child too old for a stroller?

    "Most recommendations are for kids to ditch strollers by 3 years of age," Dr. Orajiaka says. "This helps them continue to develop their strength and walking as well as stay active. However, families can consider having their strollers on hand for long-distance travels to allow for flexibility, or when a child is tired."

  • Is my stroller TSA-friendly?

    Yes. You can bring a stroller through security. Most of the time they will ask you to take out your child and fold the stroller down so that it can go through the scanner. Other times, they can scan it in the metal detector or by hand. It’s a good idea not to keep too many loose items in your stroller as you move through the airport.

  • How can I help protect my stroller when flying?

    Most airlines offer free gate-check for strollers, so they will be placed on the plane with more care than generally checked luggage. If you want, you can purchase a stroller bag to protect it.

Why Trust Verywell Family 

Parenting editor Sabrina Rojas Weiss lives in what may be the highest stroller-per-capita area of the world, Park Slope, Brooklyn. After many years as an entertainment editor, she transitioned to a career in which she can put all her baby-gear shopping skills to good use. Her son's trusty red Uppababy G-Luxe survived many a plane trip and subway ride before she finally decided he had to walk everywhere.

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