The 11 Best Jogging Strollers of 2023, Tested and Reviewed

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Four women running with jogging strollers with the New York City skyline in the background

Verywell Family / Jessica Juliao

Squeezing in a workout while you're taking care of a little one can be a tricky task. Jogging strollers offer a creative solution to combining parenting and exercise, making them a nice addition to your baby registry. Whether you’re already an avid jogger or looking to get active again after having a baby, the best jogging stroller for you should run smoothly and have built-in safety features. To find the best jogging strollers, we put 31 of them through multiple tests at the Verywell Testing Lab in New York City.

Tested & Approved

If you're looking for something to make running easier on you and your little one, the Guava Family Roam Crossover is worth every penny. We also like the Bob Gear Rambler for a versatile stroller that's also great for everyday use.

“The biggest [factor to look for] is a stroller designed for jogging. This means that the stroller has the proper suspension to support the baby during higher-velocity movement,” explains Laura Norris, a certified running coach based in Boulder, Colorado, adding that thicker and larger wheels (including a fixed or locking front wheel), as well as a five-point harness, should also be on your checklist. The American Academy of Pediatrics agrees with her about harnesses, and it also recommends looking for jogging strollers with easy-to-use brakes and a wide base for stability.

When testing jogging strollers, we considered their design features, maneuverability, assembly, ease of folding, and cost—all things to keep in mind when making this purchase.

Best Overall

Guava Family Roam Crossover Stroller

4.8
Guava Family Roam Crossover Stroller

Guava

Our Ratings
  • Ease of Setup
    5/5
  • Maneuverability
    5/5
  • Ease of Folding
    5/5
  • Overall Value
    4/5
  • Design
    5/5
Pros
  • Folds to half its size

  • Two buttons on the buckle for extra security

  • Button on handle locks and unlocks front wheel

Cons
  • No snack tray included

The Guava Family Roam Crossover Stroller easily earned the top spot on our list, receiving 5 out of 5 stars in all but one of our testing categories. Our testers loved its sleek look and how it came fully assembled, as well as its innovative front wheel lock on the handle. Testers gave it a full 5 stars for assembly. “I just took it out of the box, undid the zip ties, and unfolded it. Everything was already attached and in place,” one tester said, adding, “Why aren't they all like this?!”

The Roam Crossover Stroller impressed our testers with its sleek yet practical design, earning 5 out of 5 stars. According to our testers, “It's got a luxury car feeling to the fabric and design,” with squishy foam padding on the seat and shoulder straps of the five-point no-rethread harness to keep little ones comfortable, and a two-button buckle to keep them safe. One unique feature is the control for the front wheel lock, which is located on the adjustable, padded handlebar for easy access. “This is genius and the only stroller [we tested] that had this feature,” one tester noted. Other favorite features are the seat, which reclines pretty far back; a cover that lifts over the mesh window in the back of the stroller, perfect for naptime; and the canopy’s magnetic peekaboo window with mesh. There’s also a roomy cargo hold that will fit a diaper bag as well as a small zippered pocket for caregivers to store a phone or other valuables. Not included with this stroller are a snack tray, cup holders for the kid, bumper bar, or rain cover, though you can upgrade your stroller with the Roam Everyday Essentials Set to get several of those accessories.

Notably, this jogging stroller has airless tires, which means there’s no need to worry about flats or punctures. While some airless tires can be heavier than traditional air-filled ones, our testers found that the Roam Crossover was lightweight and easy to run and walk with, earning 5 out of 5 stars for maneuverability. “Maneuvering this stroller was fantastic, especially because of the way you can unlock and lock from the handlebar,” a tester reported. When jogging with the stroller on a running path, testers found that the swing-arm suspension helped it move smoothly over a variety of terrains, including cobblestone, which they “could barely feel.” They found it easier to use with the wheel unlocked, but with the front wheel lock button on the handle, they could switch back and forth between modes when weaving in and out of crowds.

Folding the Guava Roam Crossover was a breeze, and the instructions are helpfully located on the stroller in two places. “You just lock the wheel, collapse the handle and canopy, lift the flap by the foot area, and then lift a handle,” a tester said. “It’s super easy to fold all the way.” According to the brand, the jogging stroller is 50 percent smaller when it’s folded, and there’s no need to remove the wheels to get a compact fold. The Roam Crossover also got a full 5-star rating in this category.

Testing Notes: “Maneuvering this stroller was fantastic, especially because of the way you can unlock and lock from the handlebar. What I liked was being able to switch back and forth while running, so I could turn if there were people around. It's lightweight and easy for a non-runner like me, but I think sleek enough for a real runner.”

At $650, this stroller isn’t one of the cheapest on our list, but we think it’s reasonably priced for its many assets.

Price at time of publication: $650

Key Specs:
Product Weight: 28.5 pounds | Age Range/Weight Limit: 60 pounds or 6 months old and up | Tire Type: Airless

Woman running with the Guava Family Roam Crossover Stroller

Verywell Family / Jessica Juliao

Best Runner-Up

Uppababy Ridge All-Terrain Stroller

4.8
Uppababy Jogging Stroller

Albeebaby

Our Ratings
  • Ease of Setup
    5/5
  • Maneuverability
    4.5/5
  • Ease of Folding
    5/5
  • Overall Value
    4.5/5
  • Design
    5/5
Pros
  • Easy, quick folding

  • Simple assembly

  • Hand and foot brakes

Cons
  • Bumper bar and snack tray sold separately

With its easy assembly, quick folding process, and appealing design, the Uppababy Ridge All-Terrain Stroller is a first-rate jogging stroller. Earning 5 out of 5 stars for ease of setup, this stroller “was a dream to assemble,” a tester said. After taking it out of the box, simply pop on the wheels and lock the stroller into place.

The Uppababy Ridge shined in the design department with its array of thoughtful features, receiving a full 5 stars. It has an adjustable UPF 50+ canopy with a mesh peekaboo window for visibility, as well as an adjustable handlebar with four settings to best fit the adult’s height. It also has a hand brake and a unique foot brake, with two separate pedals for locking and unlocking the brakes. Kids require a lot of gear, so we appreciate the stroller’s spacious cargo hold, which easily fits a large diaper bag. For adults, there’s a handy mesh cupholder and a zippered canopy pocket that can hold a phone. In terms of safety, the handlebar has a wrist strap to help control the stroller’s speed, and the seat has a padded five-point non-rethread harness. The carriage has two side pockets that could fit a sippy cup or small toy, but testers wished there were a snack tray, bumper bar, and more seat padding. (Compatible snack trays and bumper bars can be purchased separately.) 

This stroller “drove nicely” with the wheel locked and unlocked, though it ran particularly well on the cobblestones with the front wheel locked. While testers found some jogging strollers nearly impossible to turn with a locked wheel, “I didn't have much trouble turning or maneuvering around obstacles,” our Uppababy Ridge tester said, giving it 4.5 out of 5 stars for maneuverability. 

An easily foldable stroller comes in handy, especially when you’re trying to load up the trunk quickly with kids in tow. To fold the Uppababy Ridge, simply press a button and twist the handlebar. When collapsed, the stroller stands upright, which is great for those with limited storage space. It earned a full 5 stars in this category.

Though there are less-expensive options, this jogging stroller is priced similarly to several of our top picks, receiving 4.5 stars for value. It can also be turned into a travel system: The stroller is compatible with Nuna, Maxi-Cosi, and Cybex car seats, as well as the Uppababy Mesa V2 car seat, with the separate purchase of an adapter. It’s also compatible with the Uppababy bassinet.

We tested the original model of the Uppababy Ridge All-Terrain Stroller, which was recalled on September 1, 2022, due to a fingertip-amputation hazard posed by openings in the rear disc brake. The brand has since released an updated model with a new rear disc brake design that should pose no danger to tiny fingers. All other features are the same.

Price at time of publication: $600

Key Specs:
Product Weight: 29.2 pounds | Age Range/Weight Limit: 3 months to 55 pounds | Tire Type: Foam-filled

Uppababy Ridge jogging stroller

Verywell Family / Jessica Juliao

Best for Serious Runners

Thule Urban Glide 2 Jogging Stroller

4.5
Thule Urban Glide 2

Amazon

Our Ratings
  • Ease of Setup
    4.5/5
  • Maneuverability
    4/5
  • Ease of Folding
    4.5/5
  • Overall Value
    3.5/5
  • Design
    5/5
Pros
  • Removable covers for cleaning

  • Very easy to turn 

  • Twistable hand brake on the handlebar

Cons
  • Not very compact when folded

For avid runners in the market for a lightweight yet tricked-out jogging stroller, look no further than the Thule Urban Glide 2. It was super-easy to put together, as it came almost entirely assembled—our testers only had to pop in the wheels and eagerly gave it 5 out of 5 stars for ease of assembly. 

The shiny aluminum and cool-toned polyester fabric (there are multiple color options available) give the stroller a sleek, modern look. It earned full marks in our design category, thanks to its aesthetic combined with several practical features, including an ergonomic handle with a twistable hand brake; large, grippy rear wheels; a zip top on the spacious cargo hold to protect your belongings from the elements; a padded five-point no-rethread harness; and a peekaboo window with a magnetic closure. The stroller’s polyester seat and canopy covers are removable, so parents can hand-wash it to take care of spills and messes.

When it comes to maneuverability, it was a mixed bag. Our tester raved about how the stroller maneuvers when the front wheel is unlocked, noting, “It turns VERY VERY well, even with one hand. The best part: It was super-lightweight and nice to handle, even with the sandbag in it.” However, after testing the Urban Glide 2 with its front wheel locked, our tester gave it 3.5 out of 5 stars for maneuverability, saying, “It was virtually impossible to turn the stroller when the wheel is locked, which isn’t ideal for when you have to steer around obstacles or other people.” While doctors often recommend locking the wheel for safety, many running parents we spoke to say they never do so for this very reason.

It’s easy to store or transport this jogging stroller, thanks to its one-handed fold, which earned a full 5 stars out of 5. Our tester appreciated the simplicity of lifting, turning, and pushing a flap with one hand for a quick fold. The back wheels can also be detached with the push of a button for a more compact footprint in car trunks or closets.

While this jogging stroller has a steep price, it's a decent investment for someone who's serious about exercise, so testers gave it a 4 out of 5 stars for overall value. As one tester says, "The stroller is going to encourage you to run!” 

Price at time of publication: $650

Key Specs:
Product Weight: 25.3 pounds | Age Range/Weight Limit: 49 pounds or 6 months old and up | Tire Type: Air-filled

Woman twisting a knob on the Thule Urban Glide 2

Verywell Family / Jessica Juliao

Best for Everyday Use

BOB Gear Rambler Jogging Stroller

4.3
BOB Gear Rambler Jogging Stroller

Amazon

Our Ratings
  • Ease of Setup
    4/5
  • Maneuverability
    4/5
  • Ease of Folding
    4.5/5
  • Overall Value
    4.5/5
  • Design
    4.5/5
Pros
  • Versatile 

  • Easy to fold

  • Reclining seat

Cons
  • Cargohold could be bigger

  • Handlebar is not adjustable

Lightweight and easy to steer, the BOB Gear Rambler is a great pick for parents who are looking for a versatile stroller that can be used for jogging or everyday activities. Before evaluating the stroller’s design and maneuverability in the lab, our testers had to assemble it, which was a bit difficult due to unclear guidance from the instruction booklet. However, after watching a tutorial video online, assembly was fairly straightforward, with the wheels unfolding and locking into place. Plus, since it weighs only 25 pounds altogether, our testers found it easy to flip over to add the wheels. Ultimately, testers docked it one point for the unclear instructions, giving it 4 out of 5 stars for ease of assembly.

The Rambler scored well for design (4.5 out of 5), thanks to its peekaboo flap on the canopy, mesh back for airflow, one-handed reclining seat with decent padding, and secure wrist strap. The five-point no-rethread harness makes it easy to adjust the shoulder straps to best fit your little one, testers found. “I wish the cargo hold had been a bit bigger—it could fit one of the diaper bags with some effort, but it was squished,” a tester noted. The Rambler also didn’t receive full marks for design because testers wished it had cupholders and an adjustable handlebar, though they did appreciate that it’s easy to turn into a travel system, as the stroller is compatible with most major brands of car seats using a BOB Gear car seat adapter (sold separately).

In terms of maneuverability, our testers found that it “rode quite well,” especially given that it’s relatively inexpensive for a BOB Gear stroller. “Even with the front wheel locked, I could move it side to side enough to avoid a small obstacle or weave in and out of crowds,” one tester reported, adding that getting the stroller up and down curbs went “pretty well.” Making a larger turn with the wheel locked was tricky, though, and could only be done by tilting the stroller back in order to lift the front wheel. So, testers docked it a point for a maneuverability rating of 4 out of 5 stars. 

Folding the Rambler is done easily with two hands, but the stroller doesn’t stand upright when folded and the lock is a little finicky, so it received a 4.5/5 rating.

Testing Notes: “The BOB Gear Rambler was one of my favorite jogging strollers to test. It was lightweight and easy to run with, and its design isn’t too athletic-looking, so it would be great for everyday use, too.”

Our testers confidently gave the Rambler 4.5 out of 5 stars for value, with one tester explaining, “For $470, this is a great jogging stroller. It had most of the things I'd want, minus a cupholder and easy turning capabilities. For the lower price point, I think forgoing those two things is worth it.” The value is especially good, since it could easily double as an everyday stroller.

Price at time of publication: $470

Key Specs:
Product Weight: 25.2 pounds | Age Range/Weight Limit: 75 pounds | Tire Type: Air-filled

Man folding the BOB Gear Rambler jogging stroller

Verywell Family / Jessica Juliao

Best Double

BOB Gear Revolution Flex 3.0 Duallie Jogging Stroller

4.8
BOB Gear Revolution Flex 3.0 Duallie Jogging Stroller

Amazon

Our Ratings
  • Ease of Setup
    4/5
  • Maneuverability
    4.5/5
  • Ease of Folding
    3/5
  • Overall Value
    4.5/5
  • Design
    5/5
Pros
  • Easy assembly

  • Can be maneuvered smoothly with one hand

  • Grips the ground well

Cons
  • Expensive

  • Tricky to fold

For families with two young siblings, a solid double stroller comes in handy. The BOB Gear Revolution Flex 3.0 Duallie was our favorite double stroller we tested, earning the same overall score (4.8 stars) as our Best Overall pick. We were impressed with it right out of the box, because it was pretty straightforward to put together, with all tools included and only the wheels needing to be assembled. Testers gave the stroller 4 out of 5 stars for assembly, as its weight and size made it a little difficult to maneuver when putting the wheels in.

Our testers loved the double BOB Gear Revolution Flex 3.0 Duallie's design, giving it a full 5 stars. The highlight of the design was the canopies—“by far the best I’ve seen,” said our tester, who liked that you can pull them down separately for each kid. Large enough to shield little legs from the sun, the canopies are also UPF 50+ with breathable mesh and peekaboo windows. Both seats have secure five-point no-rethread harnesses and recline separately, which comes in handy if only one little one is resting. Our tester did note that it might be a little clunky to recline a seat while a child is in it. Helpfully, the soft handle can be adjusted up or down, depending on the caregiver’s height.

When testing the stroller’s suspension and air-filled tires, our tester was impressed that it could be maneuvered comfortably with one hand on the ergonomic grip. “It glides easily over rough terrain and feels like it solidly grips the ground while running on a flat surface,” they added. As a double stroller, it’s naturally going to require some effort to steer, but it moved quite well for its size, earning 4.5 out of 5 stars for maneuverability.

While it received high marks for assembly, design, and maneuverability, the stroller only earned 3 out of 5 stars for ease of folding, which was not intuitive. Our testers had to read the eight steps outlined by a diagram in the manual to figure out how to collapse it, which they couldn’t do one-handed. One tester noted that since it lays flat, it would easily go in a trunk and could be done alone with some effort.

Testing Notes: “This stroller comes from a trusted brand and feels like it provides an ergonomically correct running experience. Double the kid, double the fun, and double the workout!”

This double jogging stroller earned a 4.5 out of 5 stars for overall value. Though it’s a steeper price tag, “it would be a great investment for a double stroller with excellent durability and functionality,” a tester said. “If I were in the market for a double running stroller and wanted to invest in a really high-quality stroller, I would likely choose this.”

Price at time of publication: $800

Key Specs:
Product Weight: 33.10 pounds | Weight Limit/Age Range: 50 pounds per seat | Tire Type: Air-filled

Woman running with the BOB Gear Revolution Flex 3.0 Duallie double jogging stroller

Verywell Family / Jessica Juliao

Best Budget Double

Joovy Zoom X2 Double Jogging Stroller

4.5
Joovy Room X2 Double Jogging Stroller

Courtesy of Amazon

Our Ratings
  • Ease of Setup
    4/5
  • Maneuverability
    4.5/5
  • Ease of Folding
    4.5/5
  • Overall Value
    4.5/5
  • Design
    5/5
Pros
  • Comes with an air pump for the tires

  • Convenient full bar foot brake

  • Turns well

Cons
  • Handle is not adjustable

  • Cup holder and snack tray are sold separately

Our testers were impressed by this double jogging stroller’s design, maneuverability, and ease of folding, especially given its budget-friendly price. Unfolding and locking the Joovy Zoom X2 was fairly easy, though our testers noted that installing the front and rear wheels took some elbow grease, giving it a 4 out of 5 for ease of assembly.

The stroller’s design impressed testers with its features and attractive appearance, earning a score of a full 5 stars. It’s available in neutral and bright shades to fit your family’s preferences, and it’s sleek for a double stroller, weighing only 28 pounds. To engage the brake, you simply press down with your foot on any part of the foot brake rather than on a small pedal. The carriage is optimized for your little ones’ comfort with padded, reclining seats that each have a mesh pocket. Your kids are also secure in their seats, thanks to the five-point no-rethread harnesses. The footrest has a mesh lining, “which is great if your kid has muddy or snowy shoes,” one tester observed. Plus, the extra large UPF 50+ dual canopies protect little ones from the sun while still allowing for air circulation. There are two cup holders for the adult, which can be detached and stowed in the roomy cargo hold if need be, but there’s no snack tray or stand-alone cup holder for the kids. (Those accessories are rare in jogging strollers.) While the handle is soft to grip, its height isn’t adjustable. 

The Joovy Zoom X2 was easy to maneuver, especially for a double stroller. Testers found that “it turned really well” thanks to its extra-large tires. The front wheel, which swivels when unlocked, is locked easily by pulling a handle in the wheel.

With the folding mechanism easily accessible on the handlebar, collapsing this stroller was a breeze, even despite its larger size. To fold, press two buttons simultaneously, lift it a little, and then fold it down. When folded, the Zoom X2 has two handlebars, making it easy to lift into the trunk or storage space. Our tester did note that they had to read the instructions closely, because folding wasn’t super-intuitive, resulting in an ease-of-folding score of 4.5 out of 5 stars.

This double stroller costs about the same as a middle-of-the-line single jogging stroller and has a lot of handy features, making it a great pick for families looking for a budget-friendly double jogging stroller. It also comes with an air pump for refilling the tires. Though it’s bulky when folded, “If I had a wide enough door and two kids, I would recommend this stroller,” our tester said, giving it 4.5 out of 5 stars for overall value.

Price at time of publication: $600

Key Specs:
Product Weight: 28 pounds | Weight Limit/Age Range: 55 pounds | Tire Type: Air-filled

Woman pulling the seat recline strap on the Joovy Zoom X2 jogging stroller

Verywell Family / Jessica Juliao

Best Budget

Baby Trend Expedition Travel System

4.2
Baby Trend Expedition Travel System in Millennium

Courtesy of Buy, Buy, Baby

Our Ratings
  • Assembly
    2.5/5
  • Design
    3.6/5
  • Maneuverability
    4.3/5
  • Portability
    4.4/5
  • Value
    4.8/5
Pros
  • Maneuvers well

  • Folds easily

  • Includes jogging stroller and car seat

Cons
  • Not as sleek as other options

  • Wrist strap falls off easily

For parents who are looking for a budget-friendly option or want to test the jogging stroller waters before investing, the Baby Trend Expedition drives smoothly, folds easily, and has a low price point. It’s a travel system, meaning the jogging stroller comes with Baby Trend’s EZ Flex-Loc Infant Car Seat. (Note that you should not run with an infant under six months old.) Assembly is fairly straightforward, as the front wheel comes already attached. Testers found that clicking in the back wheels, kid’s tray, and adult’s tray was intuitive, giving it a rating of 4 out of 5 for ease of assembly.

In terms of its look, the Expedition isn’t the sleekest of strollers, but it has several handy features, earning it a 3.5 in overall design. One tester observed that it’s one of the few jogging strollers with an open space between the seat and canopy, making it very breathable. There are sturdy tray tables for both the kid and the grownup, though our tester noted, “The kid's tray is permanently fixed in (with a swivel open to get the kid in and out), which is a drawback.” The stroller has a slim profile and a storage area that’s deep but narrow. Another drawback is that the wrist strap, which is attached to the handles with velcro, “falls off easily and drags,” a tester reported. The tester was also not a fan of the two-piece buckle, which has to be fit together at a certain angle, like puzzle pieces, to secure your child properly.

Our tester loved how the Expedition jogging stroller maneuvers, giving it 5 out of 5 stars and noting, “I’m surprised by how much I like running with this one. It’s really light and has a great shock system, so I didn’t feel like I was jostling the ‘baby’ (sandbag) at all.” With the front wheel unlocked, the stroller turned very smoothly, while a wheelie was necessary to turn it widely with the wheel locked.

This stroller was “one of the easiest to fold” with the folding triggers at the bottom of either handle, which need to be pulled to fold. When collapsed, the stroller is propped up by the handlebar if it’s placed in the right position. The Expedition’s overall ease of folding score was docked to 4 out of 5 stars because our tester noticed that it doesn't get very compact when folded, and the back of the seat sticks out quite awkwardly.

Testing Notes: “I could see a budget-minded parent getting this as their main stroller for an infant and slowly working their way up to a running routine once the baby is old enough. In other words, this could make a tentative jogger into someone who loves running with their baby.”

In terms of overall value, our testers gave this stroller 4 out of 5 stars. For the low price point, shoppers get both a car seat and a jogging stroller that is easy to maneuver and fold. “The price is pretty much what I'd expect, because the stroller doesn't look like it should cost more,” our tester said. “But given how easy it was to run with, I'd say it's an excellent value.” 

Price at time of publication: $250

Key Specs:
Product Weight: 41 pounds | Age Range/Weight Limit: 50 pounds or children up to 36 months | Tire Type: Air-filled

Woman jogging with the Baby Trend Expedition jogging stroller

Verywell Family / Jessica Juliao

Best Maneuverability

Bumbleride Speed Stroller

4.5
Bumbleride Speed Stroller

Amazon

Our Ratings
  • Ease of Setup
    2.5/5
  • Maneuverability
    5/5
  • Ease of Folding
    4.5/5
  • Overall Value
    4/5
  • Design
    4.5/5
Pros
  • Drives well on multiple terrains

  • Three steering settings

  • Air pump included

Cons
  • No cup holder or rain cover included

With its three steering settings, the Bumbleride Speed is great for serious running and casual outings alike. Before testing the stroller’s performance in the lab, our testers found assembly difficult. “Of all the strollers I put together, this was by far the most labor-intensive,” one tester said. “You had to screw in the front wheel, attach the rear axle, pop in the rear wheels. The canopy and bumper bar were not intuitive at all.” Though testers did report that the directions were solid and well-written with helpful color photos, the stroller earned 2.5 out of 5 stars for assembly due to the difficulty of screwing in the front wheel and confusing canopy and bumper bar installation. Fortunately, you should only have to do all of this once, so many will choose to overlook this attribute.

The stroller more than made up for that in the design and maneuverability categories, earning 4.5 stars in the former and a full 5 in the latter. The stroller features a brake that’s easy to kick up and press down with one foot, according to our testers. Other favorite features included an adjustable handlebar, a seat that effortlessly reclines with a clip, a three-part canopy that provides multiple levels of coverage, an adjustable bumper bar that clicks into place easily, and a mesh peekaboo window for circulation and viewing. Our testers also praised the stroller’s reflective elements, which come in handy for early morning runs. The five-point harness needs to be rethreaded to adjust the padded straps, and the three-part clips are a bit confusing at first, one tester noted. Though the cargo area is a bit narrow, a diaper bag can fit in snugly.

The Speed glides smoothly over many types of terrain, such as dirt, concrete, and grass, thanks to its all-wheel suspension and air-filled tires. With a long wrist strap and locking front swivel wheel, it makes running comfortable and safe for parents and little ones alike. The front wheel has three steering settings—locked, partial swivel, and full swivel—to help you transition between different terrains and activities, whether you’re taking a jog in nature or pushing your little one around the mall. 

An ergonomic trigger release makes storing the jogging stroller easy, as it folds over itself into a flat, compact shape. “It could be stowed in a trunk, standing in a garage or entry, or leaning against a wall in a deep closet,” one tester notes. The Speed got a 4.5 out of 5 rating in our ease of folding test, because it requires both hands to fold, which is not as ideal for parents of lively little ones.

Testing Notes: “In general, the stroller feels narrow and not too bulky—plus, it’s simple to maneuver with one hand. It provides a solid ride for the runner and the child and felt like it effortlessly glided over all types of terrain, including dirt, concrete, and grass.”

While there are cheaper alternatives on the market, this stroller earned 4 out of 5 stars for its value because of its narrow frame, smooth driving, and adjustable steering settings, making it a great choice for high-mileage running such as marathon training.

Price at time of publication: $619

Key Specs:
Product Weight: 26 pounds | Age Range/Weight Limit: Children up to 65 pounds | Tire Type: Air-filled

Woman running with the Bumbleride Speed jogging stroller

Verywell Family / Jessica Juliao

Best Bike Trailer/Jogger

Thule Chariot Cross Multisport Trailer and Stroller

4.2
Thule Chariot Cross Multisport Trailer and Stroller

Amazon

Our Ratings
  • Ease of Setup
    3.5/5
  • Maneuverability
    5/5
  • Ease of Folding
    5/5
  • Overall Value
    3.5/5
  • Design
    3.5/5
Pros
  • Doubles as a bike trailer

  • Ski kit available

  • Pretty design and color

Cons
  • Expensive

For especially active families, Thule’s Chariot Cross Multisport Trailer and Stroller can be a bike trailer, a jogging stroller, and even a trailer for cross-country skiing. (The jogging kit, which turns it into a three-wheel stroller with a fixed front wheel, and ski adapter kits are sold separately.) It didn’t impress us right off the bat, due to complicated assembly—the instructions are “very unclear with no text,” the rear wheels took some effort to attach, and the handlebar had to be screwed in, according our tester. However, though assembly takes time, “this is a very solid stroller—you get the sense it will last for years and years.”

The Chariot Cross soon wowed us with its design and maneuverability, earning a full 5 stars in each category. Since it functions as a bike trailer, kids are fully contained in the carriage of the stroller by netting in the front (great for keeping out mosquitoes) and clear plastic windows on the sides. Plus, there’s a small mesh window in the back so parents can peek in. Inside, there are little pockets for the kid to store a snack or toy, and there’s ample padding on the back and seat, which can recline. Our tester noted that the buckle on the no-rethread harness is only one button, “but it’s hard enough to work that a kid couldn’t do it.” Due to the shape of the trailer, there’s no space for cargo underneath, but there’s a container with a safety light attached to the back, which “is actually easier to access,” according to a tester. We also liked the pretty light blue color.

When test-driving the Chariot Cross—in its four-wheel configuration without the jogging kid—testers noted that it’s bouncy yet smooth, which would make for a fun ride for kids. Since it’s light, the stroller is easy to maneuver, and the four wheels feel stable even though the front wheels don’t lock. 

Folding this stroller was a little difficult. The buttons on the side, which collapse the stroller, are “hard to press and even harder to lift up,” our tester said, which resulted in a score of 3.5 out of 5 stars for ease of folding. The trailer also doesn’t fold down all the way unless you remove the wheels, so we don’t recommend it for people with limited storage. 

At $1,250, the Chariot Cross was the most expensive jogging stroller we tested, which is not surprising, given all of its functionalities. The jogging kit is also sold separately, adding an extra cost. “I think this is great for a real runner or cyclist but not a dabbler,” our tester said, giving it 3.5 out of 5 stars for overall value.

Price at time of publication: $1,250

Key Specs:
Product Weight: 30.4 pounds | Age Range/Weight Limit: 48.5 pounds or 6 months old and up | Tire Type: Air-filled

The Thule Chariot Cross bike trailer and jogging stroller when folded

Verywell Family / Jessica Juliao

Best Travel System

Graco Modes Jogger 2.0 Travel System

4.2
Graco Modes Jogger 2.0 Travel System

Amazon

Our Ratings
  • Ease of Setup
    5/5
  • Maneuverability
    3.5/5
  • Ease of Folding
    4.5/5
  • Overall Value
    4.5/5
  • Design
    3.5/5
Pros
  • Easy to assemble

  • Lower price point

  • Comes with a compatible infant car seat

Cons
  • Heavy

Travel systems are a useful purchase for those who are looking to find an inexpensive solution for their growing families. After conducting our testing, we decided that the Graco Modes Jogger 2.0 Travel System was our favorite option, since it’s adaptable and budget-friendly. The stroller comes with the Graco SnugRide SnugLock 35 LX Infant Car Seat, which attaches to the stroller with a one-step locking motion. Stroller assembly was easy, with all of the pieces snapping together quickly and intuitively, earning it a full 5 stars for ease of assembly. (“No directions needed!” our tester noted.)

The stroller’s design is nothing fancy but had several features our testers liked, earning it 3.5 out of 5 stars in our design category. There are handy plastic trays for both the adult’s and the kid’s drinks, as well as a space to store the grownup’s phone. The cargo hold was spacious enough to easily fit a diaper bag. The seat is cushioned well and reclines back for nap time, while the UV 50 canopy provides shade and breathability. Our tester didn’t love the harness, which must be rethreaded to adjust the height of the straps. “The buckle has this weird configuration where the shoulder straps get threaded with the waist buckle piece,” they noted, and this extra step may be frustrating for caregivers who are in a hurry.

When it comes to maneuverability, the 33-pound stroller felt “as heavy as a double stroller,” but “took turns really easily,” according to a tester. While it didn’t bounce too much over the cobblestones during outside testing, “when running on that path, it felt very necessary to lock the front wheel to feel sturdy,” reported our tester, who gave the travel system 3.5 out of 5 stars for maneuverability.

The stroller impressed us when it came to folding, earning 4.5 out of 5 stars. To fold, simply press a button at the handlebar, and rotate it to collapse the entire stroller (after removing the car seat, of course). Once folded, the Graco Modes Jogger stands upright with the help of a kickstand, which our tester noted is useful but may be confusing to employ at first.

We gave this travel system 4.5 stars in terms of overall value, considering that it comes with an infant car seat and is still quite affordable. While you can’t jog with an infant in the car seat, “you could use this as a stroller for walks in the park before they’re old enough,” a tester suggested. We recommend this stroller for those who are looking for a budget-friendly option that they don’t plan to use exclusively for frequent jogging.

Price at time of publication: $390

Key Specs:
Product Weight: 33.05 pounds | Age Range/Weight Limit: Children up to 50 pounds | Tire Type: Air-filled

Woman running with Graco Modes jogging stroller

Verywell Family / Jessica Juliao

Best All-Terrain

BOB Gear Revolution Flex 3.0 Jogging Stroller

4.2
BOB Gear Revolution Flex 3.0 Jogging Stroller

Amazon

Our Ratings
  • Ease of Setup
    4/5
  • Maneuverability
    4/5
  • Ease of Folding
    2.5/5
  • Overall Value
    4/5
  • Design
    4/5
Pros
  • Seat reclines easily

  • Can be converted into a travel system

  • Large canopy with magnetic peekaboo window

Cons
  • Foot pedal was a bit tough to unlock

  • Folding process has quite a few steps

Most people don’t run on perfectly even surfaces, so it can be helpful to have a jogging stroller that drives well on many types of terrain, like the BOB Gear Revolution Flex 3.0. It’s a single jogging stroller, though it also works with BOB car seats or other major brands with the additional purchase of an adapter. Our testers appreciated the stroller’s straightforward instructions, which guided them to simply fold a few parts into position. You do need to install a screw into the front wheel, but all necessary tools are included in the package. Testers gave this stroller a 4 out of 5 stars for assembly.

With its neutral colors and sleek build, the Revolution looks like a high-quality stroller. The large canopy has an extra mesh panel in the front and UPF 50+ for added sun protection. It also has a magnetic peekaboo window on the top, which is great for quietly checking on a napping little one. Our tester appreciated how easily the seat reclines with a string lock, allowing caregivers to customize the seat’s angle (it can be reclined with one hand, but pushing it back upright will take both hands). Inside the seat are mesh pockets, rather than cup holders or a snack tray, and a five-point no-rethread harness. The stroller’s brake engages with a foot pedal, which our tester wished were easier to unlock. While there’s no cup holder for the adult, a water bottle could be stowed in one of the Revolution’s many pockets, one of which is designed specifically for a phone. There is also ample storage available in the stroller’s cargo hold. Overall, our testers liked the Revolution’s design but felt that a few features were missing, resulting in a score of 4 out of 5 stars.

When testing this stroller on multiple types of terrain, testers appreciated the way the suspension allowed for smooth, bounce-free driving when the front wheel was unlocked, noting that it “turned on a dime and felt very comfortable.” When the front wheel was locked, however, the stroller pulled slightly to the left, which resulted in it earning a 4 out of 5 stars for maneuverability. We should note that you can quickly fix the alignment of BOB strollers with the turn of a knob located by the front wheel.

While it got solid ratings in every other category, this stroller’s folding process was not to our testers’ liking, because it requires several steps: locking the brakes, pressing on the levers by the handlebars, pushing the top half of the stroller forward, pulling up the red loop that's underneath the seat, and then finding the buckles to clip the whole thing together. One of our testers commented that it would be difficult while also juggling a diaper bag and baby.

Testing Notes: “This canopy has a lot of coverage, including an extra mesh panel in the front. It could probably cover the baby's entire torso and lap, if not more, and I love the magnetic window up top—It's easier and quieter to open, so it won't wake a napper.”

The Revolution was one of the more affordable jogging strollers we tested, and we think its price is appropriate for having solid scores in assembly, design, and maneuverability but not for performing well in the folding category. As such, our testers gave it 4 out of 5 stars for overall value. 

Price at time of publication: $550

Key Specs:
Product Weight: 28.5 pounds | Age Range/Weight Limit: Children up to 75 pounds | Tire Type: Air-filled

Woman folding the BOB Gear Revolution Flex 3.0 jogging stroller

Verywell Family / Jessica Juliao

How We Rated Jogging Strollers

4.8 to 5 stars: These are the best jogging strollers we tested. We recommend them without reservation.
4.5 to 4.7 stars:
These jogging strollers are excellent—they might have minor flaws, but we still recommend them.
4.0 to 4.5 stars:
We think these are great jogging strollers, but others are better.
3.5 to 3.9 stars:
These jogging strollers are just average.
3.4 and below:
We don't recommend jogging strollers with this rating; you won't find any on our list.

We Also Tested

  • BOB Gear Alterrain Jogging Stroller: This stroller was close to passing muster, as our testers loved how easy it was to fold and maneuver, but we found the assembly to be unnecessarily difficult, with testers needing to reread the instructions several times. Testers were also dissatisfied with the Alterrain’s storage—there was no space for a large water bottle, and it was a tight squeeze to get an average-sized diaper bag into the cargo hold.
  • Bumbleride Indie Twin Double Stroller: While we loved the design of this stroller (our tester got all kinds of compliments on it when taking it for a spin!) and it drove like a dream with the wheels unlocked, attempting to turn it with the wheels locked was a real challenge, and the price is quite steep. We think it could be worth buying if it’s in your budget and fits your needs, but we felt that the BOB Gear Revolution Flex 3.0 Duallie and Joovy Zoom X2 double jogging strollers were the most solid choices overall.
  • Graco FastAction Jogger LX Stroller: Though our testers loved how easy this stroller was to assemble, it disappointed overall with its basic, somewhat flimsy design, including its tiny front wheel, annoying rethread harness, and tricky folding strap.
  • Joovy Zoom360 Ultralight Jogging Stroller: While this stroller tested well in our ease of folding and overall value categories, it didn’t score quite high enough across the board to be included in this roundup. It was heavy to push, and the vinyl material didn’t appear to be very high quality. Testers said that it felt better suited to be a regular stroller rather than one made for exercise.
  • Cybex Zeno: This stroller received generally mediocre ratings across the board and especially poor scores for maneuverability and value. While we appreciated the hand brake for its convenience, and the plastic footrest for cleaning purposes, our testers felt that the hefty price tag ($900) wasn’t worth it, given the lack of a cargo hold, the finicky front wheel, and how difficult it was to turn.
Six testers running with jogging strollers

Verywell Family / Jessica Juliao

How We Tested Jogging Strollers

Twelve testers inspected 31 jogging strollers over three days in the Verywell Testing Lab in New York City, evaluating them on several attributes, including assembly, design, maneuverability, folding, and value. We also spoke with several experts—Christine Luff, ACE-CPT, a Road Runner Club of America certified running coach; Laura Norris, a Boulder-based certified running coach; California-based board-certified pediatrician Dr. Tomomi Hayashi, MD; and New York-based board-certified pediatrician Dr. Arunima Agarwal, MD—about safety features and reviewed guidance from the American Academy of Pediatrics on how to keep children safe while riding in strollers.

0:28
Testing the Best Jogging Strollers for Ease of Use and Durability

Testers assembled the strollers right out of the box. They were asked to note the ease or difficulty of putting them together, whether additional tools were needed, and whether they required additional help. To find out whether the assembly was intuitive or required a close reading of the instructions, we asked them to take detailed notes of the assembly process. Strollers with intuitive assembly that simply required a few parts to be clicked into place earned the highest scores.

To assess the jogging strollers’ design, testers put “babies” (sandbags) in the strollers to match each one's weight limit. That allowed them to test the ease of buckling in a baby with the strollers’ harnesses. They placed a full diaper bag into the strollers’ cargo holds to examine whether there was enough storage space in each stroller. Testers were also asked to take note of other features, such as handlebar adjustability, removable bumper bars, sun-protection canopies, cupholders, harness adjustability, wrist straps, and more. 

Testers then jogged with each stroller in a park to get a feel for how each one ran, steering them around real-world obstacles and testing them over several surfaces, such as cobblestones and cement. The strollers still had the sandbags, a water bottle, and a stocked diaper bag in them to give testers insight into how the strollers would maneuver and turn with a baby and gear in them. 

Testers were asked to fold and unfold each stroller, as an easily collapsed jogging stroller is helpful for parents as they are loading up the car or putting the stroller into storage. Like with assembly, they were asked to note whether the folding process was intuitive or confusing. Strollers with a one-handed intuitive fold got the highest marks.

Man with a folded up Graco Modes jogging stroller

Verywell Family / Jessica Juliao

What to Look for in a Jogging Stroller

Safety 

When purchasing a jogging stroller, some of the most important things to consider are the stroller’s safety features. Dr. Agarwal recommends ensuring that the stroller you pick is age-appropriate for your baby, checking that it has not been recalled, and using a stroller with a wide base and five-point harness. In terms of safety features, “Jogging strollers generally come with a wrist strap, parking brake, and larger wheels, all of which make them appropriate for this activity," she adds. 

It’s also important to make sure the child is “fully strapped into the seat with no bulky layers underneath,” Dr. Hayashi says, since that could “compromise the security of the straps.”

You should never use a jogging stroller to run with a baby under six months old, and the minimum age for some strollers may be even higher. You’ll also want to ensure that your baby can hold their head up before you run with them in a jogging stroller, regardless of their age, Dr. Hayashi adds.

Weight 

Before purchasing a jogging stroller, consider its weight. Not only do you have to factor in your child’s weight, but also the weight of the stroller, especially if you plan on using it during a workout. 

“If you’re going to use [the stroller] mostly for running, consider whether it will be too difficult to push the total weight of the stroller and your child, especially as your child gets bigger,” Luff tells Verywell Family. 

Check for a more lightweight version of a jogging stroller if you are an avid runner or love being outdoors. You’ll also be happy about that feature when it’s time to load the stroller into a car. 

Harness Type

With strollers, there are typically two different types of harnesses available: three-point and five-point. 

With a three-point harness, a baby’s legs are not secured in their seat. There are straps that go over their shoulders and between their legs, but their hips are left free. While your baby will be somewhat protected in an accident, there is the risk of their hips being left vulnerable to injury.

According to Luff, five-point harnesses are safest, especially when they have “strong, durable straps that can be adjusted for a proper fit.” The straps go over a child’s shoulders and hips while connecting between the legs. That ensures that if there is an impact, a child will remain strapped into their seat from their shoulders down to their hips.

Speaking of straps, jogging strollers also feature a wrist strap for the grownup, to prevent a runaway stroller on steep downhill paths.

Man pressing a button a Graco Modes jogging stroller

Verywell Family / Jessica Juliao

Tires and Brakes

Tires and brakes vary on jogging strollers, so depending on what you’ll be using the stroller for, it’s important to know the differences among the different types of tires and brakes. Some tires are better for rougher terrain, while some parents and caregivers prefer a hand brake over a foot brake. 

The two main types of tires are air-filled and airless. Most of the jogging strollers on our list have air-filled tires, which are similar to bicycle tires, providing a smooth and bump-free ride for you and your little one. However, you will need an air pump to fill up this type of tire, should it become low or flat at any time. On the other hand, our Best Overall pick, the Guava Family Roam Crossover Stroller, features airless rubber tires. Airless tires stand out because they’re generally puncture-proof, so you don’t have to worry about getting an air pump, but since they’re filled with rubberized foam, they may be harder and heavier to push. 

There are also two primary kinds of brakes: hand brakes and foot brakes. All of the strollers on our list have foot brakes, which act as parking brakes, keeping the stroller stationary wherever you’ve placed it. However, since they’re usually located at the lowest point of the stroller, they can be easy to forget about. Several of our top picks also have hand brakes, which allow you to be in control of the speed at which you slow down the stroller when moving, coming in especially handy when going down hills. It is important to note that if you use the hand brake abruptly, it will cause the stroller to come to a harsh stop, which could be uncomfortable for both you and your child.

Frequently Asked Questions

  • When can I start jogging with my baby?

    Even though some jogging strollers can be used from day one with an infant car seat, it is not recommended to run with a baby until at least six months. (Some even recommend eight months or older.)

    “Ultimately, you will want to defer to your pediatrician. The manufacturers of jogging strollers often recommend waiting until the child is six to eight months old,” says Norris, adding that it may be different if your baby was born prematurely. “Your child should be able to hold up their own head and chest. While some jogging strollers have car seat attachments, these are for everyday use and may be too unstable for runs.”

    In addition to heeding age and milestone recommendations, you’ll want to make sure your baby is reacting well when you first start jogging. “Always start out slow on the run, to ensure the stroller is moving comfortably, and your baby is tolerating the speed well,” Dr. Hayashi tells Verywell Family. “I would try to ensure that the terrain is as smooth as possible.”

  • Do I need to keep the stroller’s front wheel locked when jogging?

    According to Dr. Hayashi, when jogging, “You want to lock the front wheel to prevent the swivel feature from causing sudden turns.” Dr. Agarwal echoed this sentiment, noting that a locked front wheel helps to prevent the stroller from tipping. An unlocked wheel can be helpful when walking and navigating through crowds, but a locked wheel is ideal when running, to ensure the safety of you and your baby.

  • How much does a jogging stroller cost?

    Many high-quality jogging strollers do cost a pretty penny, but there are budget-friendly options, too. At $1,250, the priciest option on our list is the Thule Chariot Cross Multisport Trailer and Stroller, which we believe is worth it for its many functions, including as a jogging stroller and bike trailer. Our Best Budget pick was the Baby Trend Expedition Jogger Travel System, which includes a stroller and a compatible car seat for just $250. The Guava Family Roam Crossover Stroller, our top pick, costs $650.

Why Trust Verywell Family

Phoebe Sklansky is Verywell Family’s associate commerce editor and tested many of these jogging strollers herself. She was particularly a fan of the BOB Gear Rambler for its versatility and of the Thule Urban Glide 2 for its sleek look and many useful features.

1 Source
Verywell Family uses only high-quality sources, including peer-reviewed studies, to support the facts within our articles. Read our editorial process to learn more about how we fact-check and keep our content accurate, reliable, and trustworthy.
  1. American Academy of Pediatrics. How to choose a safe baby stroller.