50 Flower and Plant Baby Names

Learn the meaning and origins of popular flower and plant baby names

Little girl wearing a hat in a field of purple flowers

Westend61 / Getty Images

Floral-inspired names for babies were once a vintage sentiment. Names like Rose, Daisy, Violet, and Lily were most popular nearly a century ago. Just like other cyclical trends, it looks like the practice of naming babies after flowers has come back into fashion.

Giving babies names inspired by things that grow and bloom help connect people to the natural world around us. Flower and plant names can evoke a sense of innocence, simplicity, and reverence for nature. With the wide range of botanical names to choose from, there is sure to be a classic, unique, modern, bold, or creative moniker to suit your taste.

Popular Flower and Plant Baby Names for Girls

See below for some flower and plant-related baby names for girls along with their meanings, origins, and other interesting information.

Alyssum

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: A ground cover plant
  • Alternative Spellings & Variations: Alyssa, Alissa
  • Famous Namesakes: Alyssa Milano is an American actress, producer, singer, author, and activist.
  • Peak Popularity: Alyssum is a unique name that is not listed in the top 1,000 names for girls. However, the variation Alyssa has been a Top 1,000 name since 1963. It reached number 11 in 1998.


Fun Fact: Alyssum is often referred to as Sweet Alyssum. Used in herbal medicine as a diuretic, it can also be added to salad and to dishes as a colorful edible garnish.

Amaryllis

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: Beauty
  • Famous Namesakes: Amaryllis is the literary character and the heroine in Virgil's epic poem "Eclogues." Amaryllis is also the name of the piano student in the Broadway musical and movie "The Music Man."
  • Peak Popularity: Amaryllis is a unique name that is not listed in the top 1,000 names for girls.

Fun Fact: The United States imports more than 10 million amaryllis bulbs every year, mainly from Holland and South Africa.

Azalea

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: Dry
  • Alternative Spellings & Variations: Azealia
  • Famous Namesakes: Iggy Azalea is an Australian-born musician and entertainer. Azealia Banks is an American rapper, singer, songwriter, and actress.
  • Peak Popularity: Azalea entered the Social Security list of top 1,000 names for the first time in 2012. It is currently at the peak of its popularity, ranking at 483 in 2020.

Fun Fact: In Mobile, Alabama, 50 high school seniors are chosen yearly to serve as official ambassadors for the city as part of the Azalea Trail Maids. The Maids wear a pastel-colored costume with a bodice, full skirt over a steel ring enforced hoop, pantaloons, gauntlets, cape, as well as a hat and parasol. Each costume costs between $3,000-$6,000 to construct.

Blossom

  • Origin: Old English
  • Meaning: Flower-like, to bloom
  • Famous Namesakes: Blossom Russo is a fictional character from the popular 1990's television sitcom "Blossom." Blossom Dearie was an American jazz singer and pianist during the second half of the 20th century.
  • Peak Popularity: Blossom entered the Social Security list of top 1,000 names for the first time in 1903. It peaked in 1925 when it ranked number 727.

Fun Fact: The character Blossom Russo in the television show "Blossom" was known to wear trademark hats adorned with oversized flowers.

Calla

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: Beautiful, from the flower calla lily
  • Famous Namesakes: Calla Urbanski was a former American pair skater and two-time U.S. national champion.
  • Peak Popularity: Calla is a unique name that is not listed in the top 1,000 names for girls.

Fun Fact: Callas have always been known as a symbol of beauty. Venus, the goddess of love, sex, and beauty-in Roman mythology-felt so threatened by the beauty of these flowers that she cursed them to make them less attractive. The curse produced the yellow spike found in the center of each flower.

Camellia

  • Origin: Latin
  • Meaning: Helper to the priest; the flower was named after Jesuit botanist Georg Joseph Kamel
  • Alternative Spellings & Variations: Camilla
  • Famous Namesakes: Camellia Johnson was an American operatic soprano.
  • Peak Popularity: Camellia is a unique name that is not listed in the top 1,000 names for girls.

Fun Fact: In China, the camellia flower symbolizes eternal love. The petals represent the woman, and the protective calyx (the green part of the stem that holds the petals together) represents the man. When flowers fade, the petals typically fall off leaving the calyx intact. However, with camellias, the petals and calyx fall away together in devotion to one another.

Chrysanta

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: A shortened form of the word Chrysanthemum, meaning "golden flower"
  • Peak Popularity: Chrysanta is a unique name that is not listed in the top 1,000 names for girls.

Fun Fact: Chrysanthemum tea is a beverage popular in East and Southeast Asia, prepared by steeping dried chrysanthemum flowers in boiling water for a few minutes. The tea is said to reduce inflammation, calm the nerves, clear the mind, and boost the immune system.

Clover

  • Origin: Old English
  • Meaning: Good luck
  • Famous Namesakes: Marian "Clover" Hooper Adams was an American socialite and photographer who was rumored to be the inspiration for Henry James’s novel "Portrait of a Lady." Clover the Clever is a character in the "My Little Pony" animated series.
  • Peak Popularity: Clover is a unique name that is not listed in the top 1,000 names for girls.

Fun Fact: There is only one "lucky" four-leaf clover for approximately every 10,000 three-leaf clovers. The four leaves of these lucky finds stand for faith, hope, love, and luck.

Dahlia

  • Origin: Latin, Hebrew
  • Meaning: Dahlia has more than one meaning. In Hebrew, it means "flowering branch," such as the tip of a grapevine or olive branch. The dahlia flower was named after Swedish botanist Anders Dahl. Dal is the Swedish word for “valley” and the dahlia is sometimes referred to as the “valley flower."
  • Alternative Spellings & Variations: Dalia
  • Famous Namesakes: Dahlia Salem is an American actress. Dahlia Duhaney was a Jamaican Olympic sprinter who won the world title in the women's 4 × 100 meter relay at the 1991 IAAF World Championships.
  • Peak Popularity: Dahlia entered the Social Security list of top 1,000 names for the first time in 2006. It is currently at the peak of its popularity, ranking at number 352 in 2020.

Fun Fact: The 18th-century Swedish botanist Anders Dahl categorized dahlias as a vegetable because of their edible tubers which are said to taste like a mix between potatoes and radishes.

Daisy

  • Origin: Old English
  • Meaning: Day's eye
  • Famous Namesakes: Daisy Fuentes is a model and actress as well as MTV's first Latina video host. Daisy Ridley is an English actress who plays the role of Rey in the "Star Wars" sequel trilogy.
  • Peak Popularity: Daisy ranked in the Social Security list of top 1,000 names in 1900 at number 81. It hasn't been as popular since then but has continued to remain on the list of top 1,000 names.

Fun Fact: Kathleen Kelly, the protagonist in the classic romantic comedy "You've Got Mail," is a big fan of daisies. She famously quips, "They're so friendly. Don't you think daisies are the friendliest flower?"

Daphne

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: Laurel tree, bay tree
  • Famous Namesakes: Daphne Bridgerton is a fictional main character from the Netflix historical drama series "Bridgerton." Daphne Zuniga is an American actress.
  • Peak Popularity: Daphne ranked in the Social Security list of top 1,000 names in 1900 at number 926. It peaked in 1962 at number 266 and has continued to remain on the list of top 1,000 names.

Fun Fact: In Greek mythology, the river god Peneus turned his nymph daughter Daphne into a laurel tree to save her from Apollo's romantic obsession.

Fern

  • Origin: Old English
  • Meaning: Fern, feather
  • Famous Namesakes: Fern Arable is a character in the classic children's book "Charlotte's Web."
  • Peak Popularity: Fern ranked in the Social Security list of top 1,000 names in 1900 at number 193. It peaked in 1916 at number 152 and has continued to remain on the list of the top 1,000 names.

Fun Fact: The smallest fern measures only 2 to 3 inches high while the largest fern can grow 30 feet tall. These green plants with feather-shaped fronds can be found in a variety of habitats, from sea level to mountain slopes, and on all continents except Antarctica.

Flora

  • Origin: Latin
  • Meaning: Flower
  • Alternative Spellings & Variations: Florence, Fleur
  • Famous Namesakes: Flora is the name of the Roman goddess of flowers and gardens. Florence Nightingale was a British nurse, social reformer, and statistician best known as the founder of modern nursing.
  • Peak Popularity: Flora ranked in the Social Security list of top 1,000 names in 1900 at number 106. It peaked in 1902 at number 100 and remains on the list of top 1,000 names.

Fun Fact: Flora is the name of one of the three good fairies in "Sleeping Beauty" to watch over Princess Aurora and bestow gifts on her. Flora grants the princess the gift of beauty.

Ginger

  • Origin: Latin
  • Meaning: Ginger plant
  • Alternative Spellings & Variations: Virginia
  • Famous Namesakes: Ginger Rogers was an iconic American actress, dancer, and singer during the Golden Age of Hollywood.
  • Peak Popularity: Ginger ranked in the Social Security list of top 1,000 names for the first time in 1933. It peaked in 1971 at number 187 and dropped off the list of top 1,000 names in 1990.

Fun Fact: People with red hair are often given the nickname Ginger. Some think it's because redheads are said to have a fiery personality, akin to the fieriness of the ginger root. However, the tropical red ginger plant puts out rich red flowers each season, which is likely the nickname's source.

Hazel

  • Origin: Old English
  • Meaning: Hazelnut tree
  • Famous Namesakes: Hazel Dickens was an American bluegrass singer who was known for her singing style and feminist songs. Hazel Brooks was a model, pin-up model, and Hollywood star of the 1940s.
  • Peak Popularity: Hazel ranked in the Social Security list of top 1,000 names in 1900 at number 29. In 1901 it reached its pinnacle at number 23, and then descended to number 31 in 2020.

Fun Fact: Early English settlers learned how to use witch hazel sticks for dowsing-an ancient way of finding underground water- from the Mohegan Tribe. People would hold the Y-shaped sticks and point them to the ground. When they walk over a source of water, the sticks would bend downwards indicating where to dig.

Heather

  • Origin: Middle English
  • Meaning: Evergreen flowering plant
  • Famous Namesakes: Heather Locklear is an American actress who once received four consecutive Golden Globe nominations for Best Actress.
  • Peak Popularity: Heather entered the Social Security list of top 1,000 names for the first time in 1935 when it was ranked number 870. It peaked in 1975 when it made its way all the way up to number 3.

Fun Fact: "Heathers" is a classic 1989 American comedy teen film that portrayed four teenage girls, three of whom were named Heather.

Holly

  • Origin: Old English
  • Meaning: Holly tree
  • Famous Namesakes: Holly Robinson Peete is an American actress, author, talk show host, activist, and philanthropist. Holly Hunter is an actress and the recipient of an Academy Award, a BAFTA Award, a Golden Globe Award, and two Primetime Emmy Awards.
  • Peak Popularity: Holly entered the Social Security list of top 1,000 names for the first time in 1936 at number 981. It peaked in 1979 and 1984 when it was ranked number 48.

Fun Fact: Thor-the god of Thunder in Norse mythology-is rumored to be associated with the holly plant. Therefore, people would grow holly plants near their homes to prevent lightning strikes.

Indigo

  • Origin: Greek, Latin
  • Meaning: Purple blue dye color from the plant Indigofera
  • Famous Namesakes: Indigo "Indi" Walker is a fictional character from the Australian soap opera "Home and Away."
  • Peak Popularity: Indigo is a unique name that is not listed in the top 1,000 names for girls.

Fun Fact: During the American gold rush when prospectors needed durable pants for working, they turned to blue jeans. Most dyes penetrate cloth fibers, but the blue indigo binds only to the cloth's threads. With each washing, some of these indigo dye molecules also wash away, along with bits of thread. This made jeans softer over time, and somewhat customizable to fit like a second skin.

Iris

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: Rainbow
  • Famous Namesakes: Iris Bahr is an American actress, author, and producer. Iris Chang was an American author best known for her best-selling 1997 book, "The Rape of Nanking."
  • Peak Popularity: Iris ranked in the Social Security list of top 1,000 names in 1900 at number 429. It is currently at the peak of its popularity, ranking at number 127 in 2020.

Fun Fact: In Greek mythology, Iris was the goddess of the rainbow, as well as a messenger of the Olympian gods.

Ivy

  • Origin: Latin
  • Meaning: Vine
  • Famous Namesakes: Blue Ivy, the daughter of musicians Beyoncé and Jay-Z, is an American singer and Instagram star.
  • Peak Popularity: Ivy ranked in the Social Security list of top 1,000 names in 1900 at number 383. It barely held on to the top 1,000 spot in 1944 when it dropped down to number 996. However, the name Ivy made a comeback and is currently at the peak of its popularity, ranking at number 58 in 2020.

Fun Fact: Ivy symbolizes fidelity and eternal life. When ivy grows, it clings on to its host and won't easily let go once attached. The plant is also evergreen, holding on to its leaves during the changing of the seasons.

Jasmine

  • Origin: Persian
  • Meaning: Gift from God
  • Alternative Spellings & Variations: Jessamine, Yasmin, Yasmine
  • Famous Namesakes: Princess Jasmine is Aladdin's spunky romantic interest from the Disney animated film "Aladdin." Yasmine Bleeth was an American actress best known for her role in the television show "Baywatch."
  • Peak Popularity: Jasmine entered the Social Security list of top 1,000 names for the first time in 1973 at number 863. It peaked in 1993 and 1994 when it ranked number 23 on the list.

Fun Fact: Popular for its sweet scent, Jasmine has been used for centuries as a fragrance and in tea. Jasmine oil is used in some of the world’s best-known perfumes, including Chanel No. 5.

Juniper

  • Origin: Latin
  • Meaning: Young, evergreen
  • Alternative Spellings & Variations: June
  • Famous Namesakes: Saint Juniper was a disciple of St. Francis of Assisi in the 13th century. The female protagonist in the movie "Benny & Joon" was named Juniper.
  • Peak Popularity: Juniper entered the Social Security list of top 1,000 names for the first time in 2011 at number 953. It quickly climbed the charts and is now at the peak of its popularity, ranking at number 172 in 2020.

Fun Fact: In ancient times, Europeans burned juniper berries to purify homes and ward off the plague. Juniper berries have been a common ingredient in Chinese herbal medicine for centuries to rid the body of impurities and toxins.

Laurel

  • Origin: Latin
  • Meaning: Laurel plant
  • Alternative Spellings & Variations: Lauren, Laura
  • Famous Namesakes: Laurel Clark was an American astronaut.
  • Peak Popularity: Laurel entered the Social Security list of top 1,000 names for the first time in 1901 at number 869 and dropped on and off the list for the next two decades. It made its way back on the list and peaked in 1956 when it was ranked number 41.

Fun Fact: A laurel wreath is made by connecting the branches and leaves of bay laurel to create a crown or neck adornment. These were awarded to victors of competitions, including the ancient Olympics. To "rest on your laurels" means you are being complacent; still basking in former glories.

Lavender

  • Origin: Latin
  • Meaning: To wash
  • Famous Namesakes: Lavender Brown is a character in the "Harry Potter" saga. Lavender is also the name of the best friend character in Roald Dahl's book "Matilda."
  • Peak Popularity: Lavender does not appear on the top 1,000 list of girls' names.

Fun Fact: Lavender flowers attract bees with both its pollen and its nectar. Bees that feast on lavender nectar have been said to produce tastier honey. 

Lily

  • Origin: Latin
  • Meaning: Pure, white, lovely
  • Alternative Spellings & Variations: Lillie, Lilly
  • Famous Namesakes: Lily James is an English actress and model. Lily is also the name of Harry Potter's mother in the "Harry Potter" series.
  • Peak Popularity: Lily ranked in the Social Security list of top 1,000 names in 1900 at number 292. It barely held on to the top 1,000 spot in 1970 when its rank dropped to 992. However, the name Lily made a comeback and peaked in 2020 when it was ranked number 15.

Fun Fact: Pollen that falls on the lily's delicate petals can eat away at the flower. To increase the vase life of lilies, remove the pollen found in the stamens that protrude from the middle of the flower, and you'll be able to enjoy your lilies longer.

Magnolia

  • Origin: French, Latin
  • Meaning: Magnol's flower, named after French naturalist Pierre Magnol
  • Famous Namesakes: Princess Magnolia is a fictional character in the popular children's book series "The Princess in Black." Magnolia Hawks is a character in the 1926 novel "The Showboat."
  • Peak Popularity: Magnolia ranked in the Social Security list of top 1,000 names in 1900 at number 517 . Between 1941 and 2012 it dropped out of the top 1,000 names list altogether. However, the name made a comeback and is climbing the charts. It is currently at the peak of its popularity, ranking at number 177 in 2020.

Fun Fact: The Magnolia Atlas boasts very large flowers, which can reach up to 14 inches across.

Maple

  • Origin: Old English
  • Meaning: Maple tree
  • Famous Namesakes: Maple is the free-spirited character who loves nature, featured in Lori Nichol's children's book "Maple."
  • Peak Popularity: Maple entered the Social Security list of top 1,000 names just once in 1902 when it ranked 957. It hasn't made the list since then.

Fun Fact: The maple tree is the source for many common goods like pancake syrup, and wood for furniture, bowling pins, baseball bats, musical instruments, and butcher's blocks.

Marigold

  • Origin: English
  • Meaning: Golden flower. Historically called "Mary's Gold", these flowers are associated with the Virgin Mary.
  • Famous Namesakes: Marigold is the name of a little girl in the popular period drama "Downton Abbey".
  • Peak Popularity: Marigold is a unique name that is not listed in the top 1,000 names for girls.

Fun Fact: Droplets of dew gather in marigolds at night when its petals are folded up. When the petals open in the morning, they drip down like tears. Shakespeare referenced this in "A Winter's Tale" by writing, "The Marygold that goes to bed with the sun, And with him rises weeping."

Meadow

  • Origin: Old English
  • Meaning: Field of grass, vegetation
  • Famous Namesakes: Meadow Sisto is an American actress. The name Meadow was also used for characters in television shows "The Sopranos," "Orange is the New Black," and "American Horror Story: Cult."
  • Peak Popularity: Meadow entered the Social Security list of top 1,000 names for the first time in 2001 at number 806. The name almost dropped out of the top 1,000 names list in 2013. However, it made a comeback and is currently at the peak of its popularity, since ranking at number 476 in 2020.

Fun Fact: "Over in the Meadow" is a classic children's rhyme written in 1870 that teaches counting using animal references. Many different variations of the song exists and new ones are still being created.

Myrtle

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: Evergreen shrub
  • Famous Namesakes: Myrtle McAteer is an American tennis player who won the U.S. National Championships (now known as the U.S. Open) singles title in 1900, and doubles titles in 1899 and 1901. 
  • Peak Popularity: Myrtle ranked in the Social Security list of top 1,000 names in 1900 at number 32 but its popularity steadily declined until it dropped off the list in 1966.

Fun Fact: Myrtle plants are associated with the goddesses of love. The Roman goddess Venus and the Greek goddess Aphrodite both used myrtle for crowns.

Olive

  • Origin: Latin
  • Meaning: Olive, olive tree
  • Alternative Spellings & Variations: Olivia
  • Famous Namesakes: Olive Marie Osmond is an American singer and actress who is part of the show-business family, "the Osmonds."
  • Peak Popularity: Olive ranked in the Social Security list of top 1,000 names in 1900 at number 95. It dropped off the list in 1950 and finally made its way back in 2007. It ranked at number 197 in 2020.

Fun Fact: Olive Oyl is the name of a cartoon character who made her appearance in the 1920's. She first debuted as the main character of a comic strip called "Thimble Theatre." The strip was later renamed "Popeye" after the sailor character. The comic strip was eventually made into an animated cartoon series as well.

Poppy

  • Origin: Latin
  • Meaning: Red flower
  • Famous Namesakes: Poppy Pomfrey is the nurse in the “Harry Potter” series. Poppy Lifton is a character in “Gossip Girl."
  • Peak Popularity: Poppy first entered the Social Security list of top 1,000 names in 2016 at number 747. It has continued to climb the charts and is now at the peak of its popularity, after ranking at number 462 in 2020.

Fun Fact: Poppy is the name of the pink-haired princess from the animated movie "Trolls." She’s always upbeat, energetic, kind, and endlessly optimistic. Her ever-positive and spunky personality inspires others and saves the day.

Rose

  • Origin: Latin
  • Meaning: The flower
  • Alternative Spellings & Variations: Rosie, Rosy, Rosa
  • Famous Namesakes: Rose Leslie is a Scottish actress best known for her role in HBO series "Game of Thrones." Rose McGowan is an American actress who starred in television series "Charmed."
  • Peak Popularity: Rose ranked in the Social Security list of top 1,000 names in 1900 at number 18. It peaked in 1908 and 1910 when it was ranked number 16. The name remained on the list throughout the decades and is currently ranked number 113 in 2020.

Fun Fact: The world's most expensive rose cultivar was sold for $15.8 million in 2006. Famous rose breeder David Austin spent 15 years and $5 million breeding the Juliet rose, an abundant peach rose with a deep apricot heart.

Rosemary

  • Origin: Latin
  • Meaning: Dew of the sea, due to its salty texture and ability to thrive in coastal climates
  • Alternative Spellings & Variations: Rosemarie, Rosemery
  • Famous Namesakes: Rosemary Kennedy was the sister of President John F Kennedy. Rosemary Clooney was a popular singer, actress, and musician in the 1950s.
  • Peak Popularity: Rosemary ranked in the Social Security list of top 1,000 names in 1900 at number 539. It remains on the list but peaked in 1946 when it was ranked number 74.

Fun Fact: Ancient Greek, Roman, Arab and European herbalists extolled the many uses for Rosemary, including in beauty regiments like hair conditioner. It was also regarded as the herb of memory; the leaves were supposed to quicken the mind and prevent forgetfulness. 

Sage

  • Origin: Latin
  • Meaning: To be saved, wise
  • Famous Namesakes: Sage Spence is a character on the television show "Gossip Girl."
  • Peak Popularity: Sage entered the Social Security list of top 1,000 names in 1993 at number 912. It is currently at the peak of its popularity since ranking at number 223 in 2020.

Fun Fact: Charlemagne, King of the Franks and Emperor of the West, ordered sage to be planted on the German Imperial farms in 812 AD because it was highly prized for its medicinal and trading value.

Veronica

  • Origin: Greek/Latin
  • Meaning: She who brings victory. Also, refers to a plant with small, bright blue flowers.
  • Famous Namesakes: Saint Veronica is the patron saint of photographers. Veronica Lake was an actress during the Golden Age of Hollywood in the 1940s. Veronica Mars is the titular character of an American teen mystery drama television series.
  • Peak Popularity: Veronica ranked in the Social Security list of top 1,000 names in 1900 at number 213. It has remained on the list and peaked at number 68 three times since, the last being in 1983.

Fun Fact: According to extra-Biblical tradition, Saint Veronica was so moved when watching Jesus carrying the cross to Calvary that she gave him her veil to wipe his forehead. Jesus accepted the offer and returned it to her, with the image of his face miraculously imprinted on it.  

Violet

  • Origin: Latin
  • Meaning: Purple flower, purple color
  • Famous Namesakes: Violet Oakley was a renowned American artist of mural decoration during the first quarter of the twentieth century. She was also the first American woman to receive a public mural commission.
  • Peak Popularity: Violet ranked in the Social Security list of top 1,000 names in 1900 at number 109. It dropped off the list many times from the 1970s to the 1990s. However, once it joined the list again in 1998 it steadily increased in popularity. It is currently at the peak of its popularity, after ranking at number 27 in 2020.

Fun Fact: Napoleon Bonaparte declared violets his signature flower. His friends and followers began to wear violets, or violet-colored ribbons, as a way of signaling to other supporters that they were Bonapartists.

Willow

  • Origin: Old English
  • Meaning: Tree that grows by water
  • Alternative Spellings & Variations: Willa
  • Famous Namesakes: Willow Smith, daughter of actors Will Smith and Jada Pinkett Smith, is an American singer, songwriter, rapper, record producer, actress, and dancer.
  • Peak Popularity: Willow entered the Social Security list of top 1,000 names for the first time in 1998 at number 854. It has been steadily increasing in popularity and is currently at the peak of its popularity, ranking at number 48 in 2020.

Fun Fact: The weeping willow gets its name from the way that rainwater drips off the long, flowing branches like tears.

Popular Plant Baby Names for Boys

See below for some plant-related baby names for boys along with their meanings, origins, and other interesting information.

Ash

  • Origin: Old English
  • Meaning: Ash tree
  • Alternative Spellings & Variations: Ashe, Ashton
  • Famous Namesakes: Ash is the boy hero of the Pokemon cartoons. Ash Fox is the son of Mr. Fox in the animated film "Fantastic Mr. Fox."
  • Peak Popularity: Ash is a unique name that is not listed in the top 1,000 names for boys.

Fun Fact: In Norse Mythology, the universe was connected in the center by the world tree Yggdrasil. This tree is commonly thought to be an ash tree, from which the first man was formed. The first woman was said to have been formed from an alder tree.

Basil

  • Origin: Greek
  • Meaning: Herb, Greek for "King"
  • Alternative Spellings & Variations: Basel, Basile, Bazil, Bacil, Basilo
  • Famous Namesakes: Basil Rathbone was an English actor from the 1930s and 1940s who appeared in more than 70 films. Basil is also the name of the hero and title character in the Disney animated film "The Great Mouse Detective." 
  • Peak Popularity: Basil entered the Social Security list of top 1,000 names for the first time in 1900 at number 359. It steadily decreased in popularity, dropping off the list in 1971.

Fun Fact: In plant lore and legends, basil leaves will turn into scorpions if left to rot under an earthen jar. It was said that if someone sniffs the basil's scent too frequently, they could end up growing scorpions in the brain.

Bentley

  • Origin: Old English
  • Meaning: Bent grass, woodland or clearing
  • Famous Namesakes: Bentley Drummel is a character in "Great Expectations," a classic novel by Charles Dickens. Bentley Mitchum is an American actor who has appeared in over 40 films and television series.
  • Peak Popularity: Bentley entered the Social Security list of top 1,000 names for the first time in 1961 at number 951. It dropped out of the list in 1963 and reentered it in 2007. It peaked in 2011 and 2012 when it ranked 75th on the list.

Fun Fact: Bentley, the British luxury automotive company, unveiled their Bacalar two-seater cars in 2020. Only 12 of them will be built, individually personalized for its buyers, and reportedly worth about $2 million each.

Bramwell

  • Origin: Old English
  • Meaning: Nook of land where broom grows
  • Alternative Spellings & Variations: Branwell
  • Famous Namesakes: Bramwell Fletcher was an English actor who appeared in both the last silent film and the first talking picture produced in Britain. He then worked in Hollywood and on Broadway for several decades.
  • Peak Popularity: Bramwell is a unique name that is not listed in the top 1,000 names for boys.

Fun Fact: "Bramwell" is a period drama that tells the story of Eleanor Bramwell, a pioneering female doctor in the late nineteenth century, who brought medicine and women's rights to the East End of Victorian London. 

Florian

  • Origin: Latin
  • Meaning: Yellow, blond, flowering
  • Alternative Spellings & Variations: Floriano
  • Famous Namesakes: Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck is an award-winning film director whose American film "The Tourist" was nominated for three Golden Globe awards.
  • Peak Popularity: Florian entered the Social Security list of top 1,000 names for the first time in 1902 at number 968. It dropped off the list a few times in the 1900s but remained on the list until 1942. The name peaked at number 525 in 1917.

Fun Fact: Florian was a Roman emperor who reigned for only 88 days in the year 276.

Forrest

  • Origin: English
  • Meaning: Dweller near the woods
  • Alternative Spellings & Variations: Forest
  • Famous Namesakes: Forrest Gump is the titular character of a 1994 Oscar-winning American film of the same name. Forest Whitaker is an American actor, producer, and director. Forrest Gregg is a professional Football Hall of Famer.
  • Peak Popularity: Forrest ranked in the Social Security list of top 1,000 names in 1900 at number 252. It has remained on the list since that time and peaked in 1994 when it ranked number 217.

Fun Fact: There were a lot of running scenes in the movie "Forrest Gump." The actor Tom Hanks who plays Forrest isn’t a runner, so his younger brother Jim Hanks subbed for him in wide shots.

Hawthorn

  • Origin: Old English
  • Meaning: Near a hawthorn shrub or tree
  • Alternative Spellings & Variations: Hawthorne
  • Famous Namesakes: Nathaniel Hawthorne was an American novelist and short-story writer best known for "The Scarlet Letter."
  • Peak Popularity: Hawthorn is a unique name that is not listed in the top 1,000 names for boys.

Fun Fact: Hawthorn trees are also known as fairy trees in Celtic legends. In order not to disturb the fairies, farmers and landowners were often reluctant to cut down hawthorn trees. Sometimes you'll even see roadworks and motorways diverted around Hawthorn trees for the same reason.

Heath

  • Origin: Old English
  • Meaning: Someone who lived by a moor or heath
  • Famous Namesakes: Heath Ledger was an Academy Award-winning Australian-born actor best known for his roles in "Brokeback Mountain" and "The Dark Knight."
  • Peak Popularity: Heath entered the Social Security list of top 1,000 names for the first time in 1966 at number 361. It increased in popularity during the 1970s and 1980s, peaking at number 181 in 1974. It is now ranked number 983 since 2020.

Fun Fact: Actor Heath Ledger and his sister Kate Ledger were named after characters in the famous novel “Wuthering Heights."

Layton

  • Origin: Old English
  • Meaning: Settlement with a leek garden
  • Alternative Spellings & Variations: Leighton
  • Famous Namesakes: Layton Kor was a well-known American rock climber who was active in the 1960s.
  • Peak Popularity: Layton entered the Social Security list of top 1,000 names for the first time in 1907 at number 907. It came on and off the list for the next four decades, dropped off for several decades starting in 1946, and then made its way back on in 2001. The name peaked in 2014 when it was ranked number 544.

Fun Fact: "Professor Layton" is a Nintendo video game series that follows the storyline of a renowned archaeologist and professor. It is a cross between a paperback mystery novel and a collection of brainteasers. The video game eventually spawned an animated film and a mobile spinoff.

Oakley

  • Origin: Old English
  • Meaning: Oakwood or clearing
  • Alternative Spellings & Variations: Oaklee, Oak
  • Famous Namesakes: Oakley Hall was an American author whose most famous novel, "Warlock," was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 1958.
  • Peak Popularity: Oakley entered the Social Security list of top 1,000 names for the first time in 1901 at number 833. It dropped off the list in 1920. The name reappeared in the rankings in 2011 and has been climbing the charts. It is currently at the peak of its popularity, ranking at number 421 in 2020.

Fun Fact: In ancient Celtic folklore the Oak King and Holly King represent summer and winter, who continually battle for control. The Oak King is the ruler of the summer, light, fertility, and growth.

Reed

  • Origin: Old English
  • Meaning: Tall, grass-like plant. Also means ruddy complexion, red.
  • Alternative Spellings & Variations: Reade, Reide
  • Famous Namesakes: Reed Howes was an American model who later became an actor in silent and sound films.
  • Peak Popularity: Reed ranked in the Social Security list of top 1,000 names in 1900 at number 694. It has remained on the list the entire time and peaked at number 317 in 2014.

Fun Fact: In many cultures, reeds were a popular material used to weave baskets. In the Bible, Jochebed saved her newborn son Moses by hiding him by a riverbed in a basket made of reeds.

Sylvan

  • Origin: Latin
  • Meaning: wood, forest
  • Alternative Spellings & Variations: Silvan
  • Famous Namesakes: Sylvan Augustus Ebanks-Blake is an English former professional footballer.
  • Peak Popularity: Sylvan ranked in the Social Security list of top 1,000 names in 1900 at number 780. It came off the list several times in the next three decades and finally dropped off in 1936. The name peaked in 1912 when it ranked number 555.

Fun Fact: English Romantic poet John Keats refers to the urn in the poem "Ode on a Grecian Urn" as the Sylvan Historian. The urn is considered a keeper of history because its etchings depict scenes from daily life in forest settings.

Was this page helpful?